Early postinfection antiviral treatment reduces viral load and prevents CD4+ cell decline in HIV type 2-infected macaques

A. Watson, J. McClure, J. Ranchalis, M. Scheibel, A. Schmidt, B. Kennedy, W. R. Morton, Nancy Haigwood, S. L. Hu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Reports of significant reductions in plasma viral load by anti-HIV drugs have raised the possibility that antiviral therapy, if initiated sufficiently early, may result in sustained control of infection and prolonged clinical benefits. We evaluated the effects of intervention coincident with infection using an antiviral nucleoside, d4T, in Macaca nemestrina infected with a highly pathogenic isolate of HIV-2 (HIV-2287). Infection with this virus reproducibly results in high viremia and rapid CD4+ cell depletion, allowing a sensitive measurement of the treatment effect on viral load and clinical outcome. Compared to the control group, d4T-treated macaques showed significantly lower (2-3 log10) plasma- and cell-associated vital load. No CD4+ cell decline was observed in the treatment group while on therapy with d4T whereas CD4+ cells of control macaques declined from a preinfection mean of 32% of PBMCs to below 10%. Notably, when d4T treatment was withdrawn after 16 weeks, five of the six macaques continued to control viral load and have maintained normal CD4+ cell level for more than a year. These results demonstrate that early antiviral intervention, even of a limited duration, may constitute an important strategy against lentiviral-induced disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1375-1381
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume13
Issue number16
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

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HIV-2
Macaca
Viral Load
Antiviral Agents
Macaca nemestrina
Anti-HIV Agents
Viremia
Virus Diseases
Infection Control
Plasma Cells
Nucleosides
HIV
Control Groups
Therapeutics
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Watson, A., McClure, J., Ranchalis, J., Scheibel, M., Schmidt, A., Kennedy, B., ... Hu, S. L. (1997). Early postinfection antiviral treatment reduces viral load and prevents CD4+ cell decline in HIV type 2-infected macaques. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, 13(16), 1375-1381.

Early postinfection antiviral treatment reduces viral load and prevents CD4+ cell decline in HIV type 2-infected macaques. / Watson, A.; McClure, J.; Ranchalis, J.; Scheibel, M.; Schmidt, A.; Kennedy, B.; Morton, W. R.; Haigwood, Nancy; Hu, S. L.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 13, No. 16, 1997, p. 1375-1381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Watson, A, McClure, J, Ranchalis, J, Scheibel, M, Schmidt, A, Kennedy, B, Morton, WR, Haigwood, N & Hu, SL 1997, 'Early postinfection antiviral treatment reduces viral load and prevents CD4+ cell decline in HIV type 2-infected macaques', AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, vol. 13, no. 16, pp. 1375-1381.
Watson, A. ; McClure, J. ; Ranchalis, J. ; Scheibel, M. ; Schmidt, A. ; Kennedy, B. ; Morton, W. R. ; Haigwood, Nancy ; Hu, S. L. / Early postinfection antiviral treatment reduces viral load and prevents CD4+ cell decline in HIV type 2-infected macaques. In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 1997 ; Vol. 13, No. 16. pp. 1375-1381.
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