Dying trajectory in the last year of life

Does cancer trajectory fit other diseases?

Joan Teno, S. Weitzen, M. L. Fennell, V. Mor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

201 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To examine differences in the pattern of functional decline among persons dying of cancer and other leading noncancer causes of death. Design: Mortality followback survey of next of kin listed on death certificate. Setting: Probability sample of all deaths in the United States. Participants: Next of kin for 3,614 decedents that represented 914,335 deaths. Measurements: Days of difficulty with activities of daily living and mobility in the last year of life. Results: Relative to other decedents, patients with cancer experienced an increased rate of functional impairment beginning as late as 5 months prior to death. For example, only 13.9% of patients with cancer had difficulty getting out of bed or a chair 1-year prior to death. This increased from 22.2% to 63.0% in the last five months of life. In contrast, decedents from other diseases had higher rates of functional impairment 1 year prior to death (approximately 35% had difficulty getting out of bed or chair) and they manifested a more gradual increase in the level of functional decline (approximately 50% had difficulty getting out of bed). Precipitous functional decline was associated with hospice involvement and dying at home. Conclusion: Persons dying of cancer experienced sharp functional decline in the last months of life whereas other decedents' have a more gradual decline. The more precipitous functional decline was associated with hospice involvement and dying at home.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)457-464
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of palliative medicine
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hospices
Neoplasms
Sampling Studies
Death Certificates
Activities of Daily Living
Cause of Death
Mortality
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dying trajectory in the last year of life : Does cancer trajectory fit other diseases? / Teno, Joan; Weitzen, S.; Fennell, M. L.; Mor, V.

In: Journal of palliative medicine, Vol. 4, No. 4, 01.12.2001, p. 457-464.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Teno, Joan ; Weitzen, S. ; Fennell, M. L. ; Mor, V. / Dying trajectory in the last year of life : Does cancer trajectory fit other diseases?. In: Journal of palliative medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 457-464.
@article{d47907c4b5e14c0b8b40751a982d8e73,
title = "Dying trajectory in the last year of life: Does cancer trajectory fit other diseases?",
abstract = "Purpose: To examine differences in the pattern of functional decline among persons dying of cancer and other leading noncancer causes of death. Design: Mortality followback survey of next of kin listed on death certificate. Setting: Probability sample of all deaths in the United States. Participants: Next of kin for 3,614 decedents that represented 914,335 deaths. Measurements: Days of difficulty with activities of daily living and mobility in the last year of life. Results: Relative to other decedents, patients with cancer experienced an increased rate of functional impairment beginning as late as 5 months prior to death. For example, only 13.9{\%} of patients with cancer had difficulty getting out of bed or a chair 1-year prior to death. This increased from 22.2{\%} to 63.0{\%} in the last five months of life. In contrast, decedents from other diseases had higher rates of functional impairment 1 year prior to death (approximately 35{\%} had difficulty getting out of bed or chair) and they manifested a more gradual increase in the level of functional decline (approximately 50{\%} had difficulty getting out of bed). Precipitous functional decline was associated with hospice involvement and dying at home. Conclusion: Persons dying of cancer experienced sharp functional decline in the last months of life whereas other decedents' have a more gradual decline. The more precipitous functional decline was associated with hospice involvement and dying at home.",
author = "Joan Teno and S. Weitzen and Fennell, {M. L.} and V. Mor",
year = "2001",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/109662101753381593",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "457--464",
journal = "Journal of Palliative Medicine",
issn = "1096-6218",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dying trajectory in the last year of life

T2 - Does cancer trajectory fit other diseases?

AU - Teno, Joan

AU - Weitzen, S.

AU - Fennell, M. L.

AU - Mor, V.

PY - 2001/12/1

Y1 - 2001/12/1

N2 - Purpose: To examine differences in the pattern of functional decline among persons dying of cancer and other leading noncancer causes of death. Design: Mortality followback survey of next of kin listed on death certificate. Setting: Probability sample of all deaths in the United States. Participants: Next of kin for 3,614 decedents that represented 914,335 deaths. Measurements: Days of difficulty with activities of daily living and mobility in the last year of life. Results: Relative to other decedents, patients with cancer experienced an increased rate of functional impairment beginning as late as 5 months prior to death. For example, only 13.9% of patients with cancer had difficulty getting out of bed or a chair 1-year prior to death. This increased from 22.2% to 63.0% in the last five months of life. In contrast, decedents from other diseases had higher rates of functional impairment 1 year prior to death (approximately 35% had difficulty getting out of bed or chair) and they manifested a more gradual increase in the level of functional decline (approximately 50% had difficulty getting out of bed). Precipitous functional decline was associated with hospice involvement and dying at home. Conclusion: Persons dying of cancer experienced sharp functional decline in the last months of life whereas other decedents' have a more gradual decline. The more precipitous functional decline was associated with hospice involvement and dying at home.

AB - Purpose: To examine differences in the pattern of functional decline among persons dying of cancer and other leading noncancer causes of death. Design: Mortality followback survey of next of kin listed on death certificate. Setting: Probability sample of all deaths in the United States. Participants: Next of kin for 3,614 decedents that represented 914,335 deaths. Measurements: Days of difficulty with activities of daily living and mobility in the last year of life. Results: Relative to other decedents, patients with cancer experienced an increased rate of functional impairment beginning as late as 5 months prior to death. For example, only 13.9% of patients with cancer had difficulty getting out of bed or a chair 1-year prior to death. This increased from 22.2% to 63.0% in the last five months of life. In contrast, decedents from other diseases had higher rates of functional impairment 1 year prior to death (approximately 35% had difficulty getting out of bed or chair) and they manifested a more gradual increase in the level of functional decline (approximately 50% had difficulty getting out of bed). Precipitous functional decline was associated with hospice involvement and dying at home. Conclusion: Persons dying of cancer experienced sharp functional decline in the last months of life whereas other decedents' have a more gradual decline. The more precipitous functional decline was associated with hospice involvement and dying at home.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035663063&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035663063&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/109662101753381593

DO - 10.1089/109662101753381593

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 457

EP - 464

JO - Journal of Palliative Medicine

JF - Journal of Palliative Medicine

SN - 1096-6218

IS - 4

ER -