Dural augmentation: Part i-evaluation of collagen matrix allografts for dural defect after craniotomy

Zachary N. Litvack, G. Alexander West, Johnny B. Delashaw, Kim Burchiel, Valerie Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Primary closure of the dura remains difficult in many neurosurgical cases. One option for dural grafting is the collagen sponge, which is available in multiple forms, namely, monolayer collagen and bilayer collagen. Our primary goal was to assess differences in the incidence of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, including fistula and pseudomeningocele, and postoperative infection between monolayer collagen and bilayer collagen grafts. METHODS: A single-center retrospective analysis of 475 consecutive neurosurgical procedures was performed. Primary endpoints were CSF leak and infection, adjusting for the impact of additional nonautologous materials. Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify predictors of postoperative CSF leak and infection. RESULTS: The overall frequency of postoperative CSF leak was 6.7%. There was no significant difference in the incidence of CSF leak based on the type of collagen sponge (monolayer versus bilayer) used (5.5% versus 7.5%, respectively; P = 0.38). The overall frequency of postoperative infection was 4.2%. There was no significant difference in the incidence of infection between groups (4.9% versus 3.8%; P = 0.54). Bilayer sponges were associated with a significantly lower incidence of CSF leak than monolayer sponges (odds ratio, 0.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.73). CONCLUSION: Bilayer collagen sponges are associated with a reduction in postoperative CSF leak, notably in posterior fossa surgery. The need for additional non-native materials is predictive of postoperative CSF leak, along with location and type of procedure. Intrinsic patient characteristics (e.g., age, diabetes, smoking) do not seem to affect the efficacy of collagen sponge dural grafts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)890-897
Number of pages8
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume65
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

Fingerprint

Craniotomy
Allografts
Porifera
Collagen
Infection
Incidence
Neurosurgical Procedures
Transplants
Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak
Fistula
Multivariate Analysis
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Collagen sponge
  • Dural closure
  • Dural graft
  • Duraplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Dural augmentation : Part i-evaluation of collagen matrix allografts for dural defect after craniotomy. / Litvack, Zachary N.; West, G. Alexander; Delashaw, Johnny B.; Burchiel, Kim; Anderson, Valerie.

In: Neurosurgery, Vol. 65, No. 5, 11.2009, p. 890-897.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Litvack, Zachary N. ; West, G. Alexander ; Delashaw, Johnny B. ; Burchiel, Kim ; Anderson, Valerie. / Dural augmentation : Part i-evaluation of collagen matrix allografts for dural defect after craniotomy. In: Neurosurgery. 2009 ; Vol. 65, No. 5. pp. 890-897.
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