Doxycycline Treatment Reduces Ischemic Brain Damage in Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion in the Rat

Wayne M. Clark, Nikola Lessov, Jeff D. Lauten, Kristin Hazel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Agents that inhibit leukocyte adhesion including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 antibodies (anti-ICAM-1) have shown beneficial effects in experimental central nervous system (CNS) ischemia. Doxycycline inhibits leukocyte function in vitro by binding divalent cations and reduces spinal cord reperfusion injury. The authors used a clinically relevant model of focal CNS reperfusion injury to test whether treatment with doxycycline would reduce cerebral ischemic damage and improve functional outcome. Reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion was produced in adult Sprague-Dawley rats by advancing a filament into the internal carotid artery for 2 h. Animals received either IP doxycycline (10 mg/kg) (N = 13) or saline (N = 11) 30 min before ischemia, followed by 10 mg/kg every 8 h × 6. Both functional assessment (5 point neurologic scale) and infarct volume was evaluated at 48 h. Functional efficacy: doxycycline 0.5±0.2 (mean ±SE) vs control 1.3±0.3 (p = 0.03). Infarct volume: doxycycline 56±18 mm3 vs control 158±44 mm3 (p = 0.03); This protective effect supports the role of doxycycline in reducing CNS reperfusion injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-108
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Molecular Neuroscience
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Keywords

  • Cerebral ischemia
  • Doxycycline
  • Leukocyte adhesion
  • Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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