Double- and Triple-Duty Caregiving Men: An Examination of Subjective Stress and Perceived Schedule Control

Nicole DePasquale, Steven H. Zarit, Jacqueline Mogle, Phyllis Moen, Leslie Hammer, David M. Almeida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Based on the stress process model of family caregiving, this study examined subjective stress appraisals and perceived schedule control among men employed in the long-term care industry (workplace-only caregivers) who concurrently occupied unpaid family caregiving roles for children (double-duty child caregivers), older adults (double-duty elder caregivers), and both children and older adults (triple-duty caregivers). Survey responses from 123 men working in nursing home facilities in the United States were analyzed using multiple linear regression models. Results indicated that workplace-only and double- and triple-duty caregivers’ appraised primary stress similarly. However, several differences emerged with respect to secondary role strains, specifically work–family conflict, emotional exhaustion, and turnover intentions. Schedule control also constituted a stress buffer for double- and triple-duty caregivers, particularly among double-duty elder caregivers. These findings contribute to the scarce literature on double- and triple-duty caregiving men and have practical implications for recruitment and retention strategies in the health care industry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)464-492
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • double-duty care
  • men in long-term care
  • perceived schedule control
  • stress process model of family caregiving
  • triple-duty care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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