Does effective depression treatment alone reduce secondary HIV transmission risk? Equivocal findings from a randomized controlled trial

Alexander C. Tsai, Matthew J. Mimiaga, James W. Dilley, Gwendolyn P. Hammer, Dan H. Karasic, Edwin D. Charlebois, James L. Sorensen, Steven A. Safren, David Bangsberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Depressed mood has been associated with HIV transmission risk behavior. To determine whether effective depression treatment could reduce the frequency of sexual risk behavior, we analyzed secondary outcome data from a 36-week, two-arm, parallel-design, randomized controlled trial, in which homeless and marginally housed, HIV-infected persons with comorbid depressive disorders were randomized to receive either: (a) directly observed treatment with the antidepressant medication fluoxetine, or (b) referral to a local public mental health clinic. Self-reported sexual risk outcomes, which were measured at 3, 6, and 9 months, included: total number of sexual partners, unprotected sexual intercourse, unprotected sexual intercourse with an HIV-uninfected partner or a partner of unknown serostatus, and transactional sex. Estimates from generalized estimating equations regression models did not suggest consistent reductions in sexual risk behaviors resulting from treatment. Mental health interventions may need to combine depression treatment with specific skills training in order to achieve durable impacts on HIV prevention outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2765-2772
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume17
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Randomized Controlled Trials
Risk-Taking
HIV
Depression
Coitus
Sexual Behavior
Mental Health
Fluoxetine
Sexual Partners
Therapeutics
Depressive Disorder
Antidepressive Agents
Referral and Consultation
Public Health

Keywords

  • Antidepressive agents
  • Depression
  • HIV
  • Homeless persons
  • Protected sex
  • Sexual behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Does effective depression treatment alone reduce secondary HIV transmission risk? Equivocal findings from a randomized controlled trial. / Tsai, Alexander C.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Dilley, James W.; Hammer, Gwendolyn P.; Karasic, Dan H.; Charlebois, Edwin D.; Sorensen, James L.; Safren, Steven A.; Bangsberg, David.

In: AIDS and Behavior, Vol. 17, No. 8, 2013, p. 2765-2772.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tsai, AC, Mimiaga, MJ, Dilley, JW, Hammer, GP, Karasic, DH, Charlebois, ED, Sorensen, JL, Safren, SA & Bangsberg, D 2013, 'Does effective depression treatment alone reduce secondary HIV transmission risk? Equivocal findings from a randomized controlled trial', AIDS and Behavior, vol. 17, no. 8, pp. 2765-2772. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-013-0600-3
Tsai, Alexander C. ; Mimiaga, Matthew J. ; Dilley, James W. ; Hammer, Gwendolyn P. ; Karasic, Dan H. ; Charlebois, Edwin D. ; Sorensen, James L. ; Safren, Steven A. ; Bangsberg, David. / Does effective depression treatment alone reduce secondary HIV transmission risk? Equivocal findings from a randomized controlled trial. In: AIDS and Behavior. 2013 ; Vol. 17, No. 8. pp. 2765-2772.
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