Diverse Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria isolated from submarine basalts at Loihi seamount

Alexis S. Templeton, Hubert Staudigel, Bradley Tebo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

119 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metal-oxidizing bacteria may play a key role in the submarine weathering of volcanic rocks and the formation of ferromanganese crusts. Putative fossil microbes encrusted in Mn oxide phases are commonly observed on volcanic glasses recovered from the deep ocean; however, no known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria have been directly identified or cultured from natural weathered basalts. To isolate epilithic Mn(II) oxidizing bacteria, we collected young, oxidized pillow basalts from the cold, outer portions of Loihi Seamount, and from nearby exposures of pillow basalts at South Point and Kealakekua Bay, HI. SEM imaging, EDS spectra and X-ray absorption spectroscopy data show that microbial biolfilms and associated Mn oxides were abundant on the basalt surfaces. Using a series of seawater-based media that range from highly oligotrophic to organic-rich, we have obtained 26 mesophilic, heterotrophic Mn(II)-oxidizing isolates dominated by α and γ-Proteobacteria, such as Sulfitobacter, Methylarcula and Pseudoatteromonas spp. Additional isolates include Microbulbifer, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, and Halomonas spp. None of the isolate, nor their closet relatives, were previosly recognized as Mn(II) oxidizing bacteria. The physiological function of Mn(II) oxidation is clearly spread amongst many phylogenetically diverse organisms colonizing basalt surfaces. Our findings support a biological catalist of Mn(II) oxidation during basalt-wearing, and suggest heterotrophic Mn(II) oxidixing bacteria may be ubiquitously associated with submarine glasses within epilithic and endolithic biofilms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-139
Number of pages13
JournalGeomicrobiology Journal
Volume22
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

seamount
Bacteria
basalt
bacterium
Oxides
Glass
Marinobacter
Alteromonas
Halomonas
X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy
oxide
Volcanic rocks
oxidation
Proteobacteria
Oxidation
volcanic glass
X ray absorption spectroscopy
Seawater
Biofilms
atomic absorption spectroscopy

Keywords

  • Basalt
  • Biofilm
  • Manganese oxidation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Microbiology
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Diverse Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria isolated from submarine basalts at Loihi seamount. / Templeton, Alexis S.; Staudigel, Hubert; Tebo, Bradley.

In: Geomicrobiology Journal, Vol. 22, No. 3-4, 04.2005, p. 127-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Templeton, Alexis S. ; Staudigel, Hubert ; Tebo, Bradley. / Diverse Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria isolated from submarine basalts at Loihi seamount. In: Geomicrobiology Journal. 2005 ; Vol. 22, No. 3-4. pp. 127-139.
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