Dissolution of dense chlorinated solvents into groundwater. 3. Modeling contaminant plumes from fingers and pools of solvent

M. R. Anderson, Richard Johnson, J. F. Pankow

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Analytical transport models are used to examine why concentrations observed in the field are typically low. The results suggest that the main reason is that CHC solvent below the water table tends to accumulate as stagnant pools located on the tops of low-permeability layers, or on top of an underlying aquitard. The rate at which CHC solvent dissolves from a pool into the flowing groundwater is controlled by vertical dispersion. Large fingers of solvent are not a likely source morphology in the saturated zone, and water flowing through many small fingers would cause such fingers to dissolve too quickly to be able to provide the type of long-term contamination that is observed at many CHC solvent spill sites. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEnvironmental Science & Technology
Pages901-908
Number of pages8
Volume26
Edition5
StatePublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Groundwater
Dissolution
plume
dissolution
Impurities
groundwater
pollutant
modeling
aquitard
Water
phreatic zone
Hazardous materials spills
water table
Contamination
permeability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Anderson, M. R., Johnson, R., & Pankow, J. F. (1992). Dissolution of dense chlorinated solvents into groundwater. 3. Modeling contaminant plumes from fingers and pools of solvent. In Environmental Science & Technology (5 ed., Vol. 26, pp. 901-908)

Dissolution of dense chlorinated solvents into groundwater. 3. Modeling contaminant plumes from fingers and pools of solvent. / Anderson, M. R.; Johnson, Richard; Pankow, J. F.

Environmental Science & Technology. Vol. 26 5. ed. 1992. p. 901-908.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Anderson, MR, Johnson, R & Pankow, JF 1992, Dissolution of dense chlorinated solvents into groundwater. 3. Modeling contaminant plumes from fingers and pools of solvent. in Environmental Science & Technology. 5 edn, vol. 26, pp. 901-908.
Anderson MR, Johnson R, Pankow JF. Dissolution of dense chlorinated solvents into groundwater. 3. Modeling contaminant plumes from fingers and pools of solvent. In Environmental Science & Technology. 5 ed. Vol. 26. 1992. p. 901-908
Anderson, M. R. ; Johnson, Richard ; Pankow, J. F. / Dissolution of dense chlorinated solvents into groundwater. 3. Modeling contaminant plumes from fingers and pools of solvent. Environmental Science & Technology. Vol. 26 5. ed. 1992. pp. 901-908
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