Differential control of opioid antinociception to thermal stimuli in a knock-in mouse expressing regulator of G-protein signaling-insensitive Gαo protein

Jennifer T. Lamberts, Chelsea E. Smith, Minghua Li, Susan Ingram, Richard R. Neubig, John R. Traynor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins classically function as negative modulators of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. In vitro, RGS proteins have been shown to inhibit signaling by agonists at the μ-opioid receptor, including morphine. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of endogenous RGS proteins to the antinociceptive effects of morphine and other opioid agonists. To do this, a knock-in mouse that expresses an RGS-insensitive (RGSi) mutant Gαo protein, Gαo G184S (Gαo RGSi), was evaluated for morphine or methadone antinociception in response to noxious thermal stimuli. Mice expressing Gαo RGSi subunits exhibited a naltrexone-sensitive enhancement of baseline latency in both the hot-plate and warm-water tail-withdrawal tests. In the hot-plate test, a measure of supraspinal nociception, morphine antinociception was increased, and this was associated with an increased ability of opioids to inhibit presynaptic GABA neurotransmission in the periaqueductal gray. In contrast, antinociception produced by either morphine or methadone was reduced in the tail-withdrawal test, a measure of spinal nociception. In whole-brain and spinal cord homogenates from mice expressing Gαo RGSi subunits, there was a small loss of Gαo expression and an accompanying decrease in basal G-protein activity. Our results strongly support a role for RGS proteins as negative regulators of opioid supraspinal antinociception and also reveal a potential novel function of RGS proteins as positive regulators of opioid spinal antinociceptive pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4369-4377
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume33
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 6 2013

Fingerprint

RGS Proteins
GTP-Binding Protein Regulators
Morphine
Opioid Analgesics
Hot Temperature
Nociception
Methadone
Proteins
Tail
Periaqueductal Gray
Naltrexone
Aptitude
Opioid Receptors
Mutant Proteins
G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
GTP-Binding Proteins
Synaptic Transmission
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Spinal Cord
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Differential control of opioid antinociception to thermal stimuli in a knock-in mouse expressing regulator of G-protein signaling-insensitive Gαo protein. / Lamberts, Jennifer T.; Smith, Chelsea E.; Li, Minghua; Ingram, Susan; Neubig, Richard R.; Traynor, John R.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 33, No. 10, 06.03.2013, p. 4369-4377.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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