Dietary protein intake and progressive glomerular sclerosis: The role of capillary hypertension and hyperperfusion in the progression of renal disease

T. W. Meyer, Sharon Anderson, B. M. Brenner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Unrestricted intake of protein-rich foods is accompanied by sustained increases in glomerular capillary pressures and flows. Intrarenal hypertension and hyperperfusion associated with protein intake may eventually cause glomerular sclerosis and account for decreased renal function seen with aging. Further elevation of glomerular capillary pressures and flows contributes to progressive glomerular destruction and eventual loss of renal function when nephron number has been reduced by renal disease. Progressive loss of renal function may be retarded by restriction of protein intake. Protein restriction appears to preserve renal function by limiting intrarenal capillary hypertension and hyperperfusion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)832-838
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume98
Issue number5 Suppl.
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Dietary Proteins
Sclerosis
Disease Progression
Hypertension
Kidney
Proteins
Pressure
Nephrons
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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