Diabetes mortality among New Mexico's American Indian, hispanic, and non-hispanic white populations, 1958-1987

Janette S. Garter, Charles L. Wiggins, Thomas Becker, Charles R. Key, Jonathan M. Samet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To determine the diabetes-related mortality rates among New Mexico's American Indians, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic whites over a 30-yr period. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Death certificates were used to identify diabetes as an underlying cause of death by ethnic group in New Mexico during each 5-yr period from 1958 through 1987. The age-adjusted rates were calculated by ethnic group and sex, and temporal trends were examined. Comparison was made to U.S. white age-adjusted rates during the same time period. RESULTS - Age-adjusted diabetes mortality rates for American Indians and Hispanics increased throughout the 30-yr period, and far exceeded rates for New Mexico non-Hispanic whites and U.S. whites by the 1983-1987 time period. The rates increased most dramatically among the state's American Indians, increasing 550% among women and 249% among men. Hispanic women and men experienced increases of 112 and 140%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS - New Mexico's American Indian and Hispanic populations have higher diabetes mortality rates than non-Hispanic whites, and American Indian mortality rates have risen dramatically over the 30-yr period included in our study. Although the high prevalence of diabetes in American Indians and Hispanics is a major contributor to these rates, other factors may also influence the reported mortality rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-309
Number of pages4
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume16
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1993
Externally publishedYes

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North American Indians
Hispanic Americans
Mortality
Population
Ethnic Groups
Death Certificates
Cause of Death
Research Design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Diabetes mortality among New Mexico's American Indian, hispanic, and non-hispanic white populations, 1958-1987. / Garter, Janette S.; Wiggins, Charles L.; Becker, Thomas; Key, Charles R.; Samet, Jonathan M.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.1993, p. 306-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garter, Janette S. ; Wiggins, Charles L. ; Becker, Thomas ; Key, Charles R. ; Samet, Jonathan M. / Diabetes mortality among New Mexico's American Indian, hispanic, and non-hispanic white populations, 1958-1987. In: Diabetes Care. 1993 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 306-309.
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