Developmental antecedents of cardiovascular disease

A historical perspective

David J P Barker, Susan Bagby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

133 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Knowledge of the fetal antecedents of cardiovascular disease has increased rapidly since the association between low birth weight and the disease was demonstrated 20 yr ago. It now is known that individuals who had low birth weight or who were thin or short at birth are at increased risk for both cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. This has been shown in studies in different countries and cannot be explained by confounding variables. Through clinical and animal studies, the biologic processes that underlie the epidemiologic associations and how their effects are modified by postnatal growth and by living conditions in childhood and adult life are beginning to be understood. One such process is altered renal development, with reduced nephron numbers, which may initiate hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2537-2544
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume16
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

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Low Birth Weight Infant
Cardiovascular Diseases
Beginning of Human Life
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Social Conditions
Nephrons
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Parturition
Hypertension
Kidney
Growth
Clinical Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Developmental antecedents of cardiovascular disease : A historical perspective. / Barker, David J P; Bagby, Susan.

In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Vol. 16, No. 9, 2005, p. 2537-2544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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