Development of an Instrument to Document the 5A's for Smoking Cessation

Peter J. Lawson, Sue Flocke, Brad Casucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The widely recommended 5A's strategy for brief smoking cessation includes five tasks: Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, and Arrange. Assessments of the 5A's have been limited to medical-record review and self-report. Using observational data, an instrument to assess the rate at which the 5A's are accomplished was developed. Methods: The 5A's Direct Observation Coding scheme (5A-DOC) was developed using published 5A's guidelines and was refined using observed clinician-patient interactions. The development sample consisted of 46 audio-recorded visits of smokers with their physician (n=5), collected in 2000. The 5A-DOC was next applied to a second sample of 131 visits with 28 physicians between 2005 and 2008. Inter-rater reliability was assessed and frequencies reported. Analyses were completed in 2008. Results: Three observations shaped the development of the 5A-DOC: (1) patients accomplish 5A's tasks; (2) some communication actions accomplish multiple 5A's tasks simultaneously; and (3) sequence is important. Inter-rater agreement for identifying each task was moderate to excellent (kappa=0.58-1.0). When smoking status was established (Ask, n=78), 61% Assessed readiness, and 50% contained Assist. In all, 73% failed to complete the 5A's adequately. Conclusions: Accounting for patient activity in smoking-cessation discussions is essential to accurately capture the degree to which the 5A's have been accomplished. The 5A-DOC can be applied to audio or transcript data to reliably assess which of the 5A's tasks have been accomplished. Clinician performance of the 5A's was modest, and findings suggest that clinician training should focus on Assess and the timing of this task, and alignment with patients' reported readiness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-254
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of preventive medicine
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Smoking Cessation
Observation
Physicians
Self Report
Medical Records
Smoking
Communication
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Development of an Instrument to Document the 5A's for Smoking Cessation. / Lawson, Peter J.; Flocke, Sue; Casucci, Brad.

In: American journal of preventive medicine, Vol. 37, No. 3, 01.09.2009, p. 248-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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