Dehydroepiandrosterone and age-related cognitive decline

Krystina G. Sorwell, Henryk F. Urbanski

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    38 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    In humans the circulating concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) decrease markedly during aging, and have been implicated in age-associated cognitive decline. This has led to the hypothesis that DHEA supplementation during aging may improve memory. In rodents, a cognitive anti-aging effect of DHEA and DHEAS has been observed but it is unclear whether this effect is mediated indirectly through conversion of these steroids to estradiol. Moreover, despite the demonstration of correlations between endogenous DHEA concentrations and cognitive ability in certain human patient populations, such correlations have yet to be convincingly demonstrated during normal human aging. This review highlights important differences between rodents and primates in terms of their circulating DHEA and DHEAS concentrations, and suggests that age-related changes within the human DHEA metabolic pathway may contribute to the relative inefficacy of DHEA replacement therapies in humans. The review also highlights the value of using nonhuman primates as a pragmatic animal model for testing the therapeutic potential of DHEA for age-associate cognitive decline in humans.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)61-67
    Number of pages7
    JournalAge
    Volume32
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Mar 2010

    Keywords

    • Cognitive decline
    • Dehydroepiandrosterone
    • Intracrinology
    • Neurosteroidogenesis

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Aging
    • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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