D-dimer is not elevated in asymptomatic high altitude climbers after descent to 5340m

The mount everest deep venous thrombosis study (Ev-DVT)

Ken Zafren, Joanne Feldman, Robert J. Becker, Sarah R. Williams, Eric A. Weiss, Thomas Deloughery

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Zafren, Ken, Joane Feldman, Robert J. Becker, Sarah R. Williams, Eric A Weiss, and Tom Deloughery. D-dimer is not elevated in asymptomatic high altitude climbers after descent to 5340 meters: the Mount Everest deep venous thrombosis study (Ev-DVT). High Alt. Med. Biol. 12:223-227, 2011.-We performed this study to determine the prevalence of elevated D-dimer, a marker for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), in asymptomatic high altitude climbers. On-site personnel enrolled a convenience sample of climbers at Mt. Everest Base Camp (Nepal), elevation 5340m (17,500ft), during a single spring climbing season. Subjects were enrolled after descent to base camp from higher elevation. The subjects completed a questionnaire to evaluate their risk factors for DVT. We then performed a D-dimer test in asymptomatic individuals. If the D-dimer test was negative, DVT was considered ruled out. Ultrasound was available to perform lower-extremity compression ultrasounds to evaluate for DVT in case the D-dimer was positive. We enrolled 76 high altitude climbers. None had a positive D-dimer test. The absence of positive D-dimer tests suggests a low prevalence of DVT in asymptomatic high altitude climbers.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)223-227
    Number of pages5
    JournalHigh Altitude Medicine and Biology
    Volume12
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Oct 1 2011

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    Venous Thrombosis
    Nepal
    fibrin fragment D
    Lower Extremity

    Keywords

    • coagulation
    • D-dimer
    • deep venous thrombosis
    • high altitude
    • hypoxia
    • venous thromboembolism

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)
    • Physiology
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

    Cite this

    D-dimer is not elevated in asymptomatic high altitude climbers after descent to 5340m : The mount everest deep venous thrombosis study (Ev-DVT). / Zafren, Ken; Feldman, Joanne; Becker, Robert J.; Williams, Sarah R.; Weiss, Eric A.; Deloughery, Thomas.

    In: High Altitude Medicine and Biology, Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.10.2011, p. 223-227.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Zafren, Ken ; Feldman, Joanne ; Becker, Robert J. ; Williams, Sarah R. ; Weiss, Eric A. ; Deloughery, Thomas. / D-dimer is not elevated in asymptomatic high altitude climbers after descent to 5340m : The mount everest deep venous thrombosis study (Ev-DVT). In: High Altitude Medicine and Biology. 2011 ; Vol. 12, No. 3. pp. 223-227.
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