Cryptic vascular malformations of the spinal cord

Diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging and outcome of surgery

S. L. Barnwell, C. F. Dowd, R. L. Davis, M. S B Edwards, P. H. Gutin, C. B. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cases of seven patients with intramedullary, cryptic vascular malformations of the spinal cord are reported. In all patients, the clinical course was progressive; a Brown-Sequard syndrome was the most common presenting symptom complex. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in all patients. The pattern seen most often was a focus of high signal (on both T1-and T2-weighted MR images) surrounded by a larger zone of low signal (best seen on T2-weighted images), and was remarkably similar for all patients. Six patients underwent surgical exploration; removal of the lesions halted the progression of symptoms in five patients and one patient had worsened sensory function after surgery. Motor function did not decrease postoperatively in any patient. The one patient who refused surgery has continued to decline neurologically. Histopathological examination of surgical specimens showed a cavernous malformation in one patient, a venous malformation in one, venous varices in two, and organizing hematomas in two; these findings are markedly different from those in previously reported cases of cryptic vascular malformations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-407
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume72
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vascular Malformations
Spinal Cord
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brown-Sequard Syndrome
Varicose Veins
Hematoma
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Keywords

  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • spinal cord
  • vascular malformation, cryptic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Barnwell, S. L., Dowd, C. F., Davis, R. L., Edwards, M. S. B., Gutin, P. H., & Wilson, C. B. (1990). Cryptic vascular malformations of the spinal cord: Diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging and outcome of surgery. Journal of Neurosurgery, 72(3), 403-407.

Cryptic vascular malformations of the spinal cord : Diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging and outcome of surgery. / Barnwell, S. L.; Dowd, C. F.; Davis, R. L.; Edwards, M. S B; Gutin, P. H.; Wilson, C. B.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 72, No. 3, 1990, p. 403-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barnwell, SL, Dowd, CF, Davis, RL, Edwards, MSB, Gutin, PH & Wilson, CB 1990, 'Cryptic vascular malformations of the spinal cord: Diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging and outcome of surgery', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 72, no. 3, pp. 403-407.
Barnwell, S. L. ; Dowd, C. F. ; Davis, R. L. ; Edwards, M. S B ; Gutin, P. H. ; Wilson, C. B. / Cryptic vascular malformations of the spinal cord : Diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging and outcome of surgery. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 1990 ; Vol. 72, No. 3. pp. 403-407.
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