Cost burden and treatment patterns associated with management of heavy menstrual bleeding

Jeffrey Jensen, Patrick Lefebvre, François Laliberté, Sujata P. Sarda, Amy Law, Jennifer Pocoski, Mei Sheng Duh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study evaluated the healthcare resource use, work productivity loss, costs, and treatment patterns associated with newly diagnosed idiopathic heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) using a large employer database. Methods: Medical and pharmacy claims (1998-2009) from 55 self-insured U.S. companies were analyzed. Women aged 18-52 years with ≥2 HMB claims (ICD-9 626.2, 627.0) and continuously enrolled for ≥6 months before the first claim were matched 1:1 with controls. Exclusion criteria were cancer, pregnancy, and infertility; HMB-related uterine conditions; endometrial ablation; hysterectomy; anticoagulant medications; and other known HMB causes. All-cause healthcare resource use and costs were compared between the HMB and control cohorts using statistical methods accounting for matched study design. Treatment patterns were examined for HMB subjects. Results: HMB and control cohorts (n=29,842 in both) were matched and balanced in baseline characteristics and costs. During follow-up, HMB subjects had significantly higher all-cause resource use than did control subjects: hospitalization incidence rate ratio (IRR)=2.70 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.62-2.79); emergency room visits IRR=1.35 (95% CI 1.31-1.38); outpatient visits IRR=1.29 (95% CI 1.29-1.30). Average annualized all-cause costs were also higher for HMB subjects than controls (mean difference $2,607, p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)539-547
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012

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Health Care Costs
Hemorrhage
Confidence Intervals
Costs and Cost Analysis
Incidence
Endometrial Ablation Techniques
Delivery of Health Care
Uterine Hemorrhage
International Classification of Diseases
Hysterectomy
Anticoagulants
Infertility
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
Outpatients
Databases
Pregnancy
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Jensen, J., Lefebvre, P., Laliberté, F., Sarda, S. P., Law, A., Pocoski, J., & Duh, M. S. (2012). Cost burden and treatment patterns associated with management of heavy menstrual bleeding. Journal of Women's Health, 21(5), 539-547. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2011.3147

Cost burden and treatment patterns associated with management of heavy menstrual bleeding. / Jensen, Jeffrey; Lefebvre, Patrick; Laliberté, François; Sarda, Sujata P.; Law, Amy; Pocoski, Jennifer; Duh, Mei Sheng.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 21, No. 5, 01.05.2012, p. 539-547.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jensen, J, Lefebvre, P, Laliberté, F, Sarda, SP, Law, A, Pocoski, J & Duh, MS 2012, 'Cost burden and treatment patterns associated with management of heavy menstrual bleeding', Journal of Women's Health, vol. 21, no. 5, pp. 539-547. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2011.3147
Jensen, Jeffrey ; Lefebvre, Patrick ; Laliberté, François ; Sarda, Sujata P. ; Law, Amy ; Pocoski, Jennifer ; Duh, Mei Sheng. / Cost burden and treatment patterns associated with management of heavy menstrual bleeding. In: Journal of Women's Health. 2012 ; Vol. 21, No. 5. pp. 539-547.
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