Constructing a Local Potential Participant Registry to Improve Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Research Recruitment

Joshua D. Grill, Dan Hoang, Daniel L. Gillen, Chelsea G. Cox, Adrijana Gombosev, Kirsten Klein, Steve O'Leary, Megan Witbracht, Aimee Pierce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Potential participant registries are tools to address the challenge of slow recruitment to clinical research. In particular, registries may aid recruitment to secondary prevention clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD), which enroll cognitively normal older individuals meeting specific genetic or biomarker criteria. Evidence of registry effectiveness is sparse, as is guidance on optimal designs or methods of conduct. We report our experiences of developing a novel local potential participant registry that implemented online enrollment and data collection. In the first year of operation, 957 individuals submitted email addresses to the registry, of whom 592 self-reported demographic, family history, and medical data. In addition, registrants provided information related to their interest and willingness to be contacted about studies. Local earned media and community education were the most effective methods of recruitment into the registry. Seventy-six (26%) of 298 registrants contacted about studies in the first year enrolled in those studies. One hundred twenty-nine registrants were invited to enroll in a preclinical AD trial, of whom 25 (18%) screened and 6 were randomized. These results indicate that registries can aid recruitment and provide needed guidance for investigators initiating new local registries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1055-1063
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume63
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Registries
Alzheimer Disease
Research
Medical History Taking
Secondary Prevention
Biomarkers
Research Personnel
Demography
Clinical Trials
Education

Keywords

  • Clinical trial
  • preclinical Alzheimer's disease
  • recruitment
  • registries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Constructing a Local Potential Participant Registry to Improve Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Research Recruitment. / Grill, Joshua D.; Hoang, Dan; Gillen, Daniel L.; Cox, Chelsea G.; Gombosev, Adrijana; Klein, Kirsten; O'Leary, Steve; Witbracht, Megan; Pierce, Aimee.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Vol. 63, No. 3, 01.01.2018, p. 1055-1063.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grill, JD, Hoang, D, Gillen, DL, Cox, CG, Gombosev, A, Klein, K, O'Leary, S, Witbracht, M & Pierce, A 2018, 'Constructing a Local Potential Participant Registry to Improve Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Research Recruitment', Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, vol. 63, no. 3, pp. 1055-1063. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-180069
Grill, Joshua D. ; Hoang, Dan ; Gillen, Daniel L. ; Cox, Chelsea G. ; Gombosev, Adrijana ; Klein, Kirsten ; O'Leary, Steve ; Witbracht, Megan ; Pierce, Aimee. / Constructing a Local Potential Participant Registry to Improve Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Research Recruitment. In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 2018 ; Vol. 63, No. 3. pp. 1055-1063.
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