Confidentiality and the curb-side consultation.

G. T. Chiodo, Susan Tolle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dentists who encounter friends or relatives who request professional opinions about oral health problems are placed in difficult positions that may impose a duty to provide some advice or intervention. Even more awkward is the situation in which a dentist recognizes a pathosis in a nonpatient who is not seeking advice. The ethical principle of beneficence may confer an obligation upon the dentist to act in a professional role even though no professional relationship exists. There are criteria that guide providers in establishing that such a duty of specific beneficence is present; dentists must meet this duty while not violating the same principle of doctor-patient confidentiality that would exist if the nonpatient were, in fact, a patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)440-444
Number of pages5
JournalGeneral Dentistry
Volume46
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1998

Fingerprint

Confidentiality
Dentists
Referral and Consultation
Beneficence
Professional Role
Oral Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Confidentiality and the curb-side consultation. / Chiodo, G. T.; Tolle, Susan.

In: General Dentistry, Vol. 46, No. 5, 09.1998, p. 440-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chiodo, GT & Tolle, S 1998, 'Confidentiality and the curb-side consultation.', General Dentistry, vol. 46, no. 5, pp. 440-444.
Chiodo, G. T. ; Tolle, Susan. / Confidentiality and the curb-side consultation. In: General Dentistry. 1998 ; Vol. 46, No. 5. pp. 440-444.
@article{9cc20806a38a4747a9a76d878bfc2b08,
title = "Confidentiality and the curb-side consultation.",
abstract = "Dentists who encounter friends or relatives who request professional opinions about oral health problems are placed in difficult positions that may impose a duty to provide some advice or intervention. Even more awkward is the situation in which a dentist recognizes a pathosis in a nonpatient who is not seeking advice. The ethical principle of beneficence may confer an obligation upon the dentist to act in a professional role even though no professional relationship exists. There are criteria that guide providers in establishing that such a duty of specific beneficence is present; dentists must meet this duty while not violating the same principle of doctor-patient confidentiality that would exist if the nonpatient were, in fact, a patient.",
author = "Chiodo, {G. T.} and Susan Tolle",
year = "1998",
month = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "46",
pages = "440--444",
journal = "General Dentistry",
issn = "0363-6771",
publisher = "Academy of General Dentistry",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Confidentiality and the curb-side consultation.

AU - Chiodo, G. T.

AU - Tolle, Susan

PY - 1998/9

Y1 - 1998/9

N2 - Dentists who encounter friends or relatives who request professional opinions about oral health problems are placed in difficult positions that may impose a duty to provide some advice or intervention. Even more awkward is the situation in which a dentist recognizes a pathosis in a nonpatient who is not seeking advice. The ethical principle of beneficence may confer an obligation upon the dentist to act in a professional role even though no professional relationship exists. There are criteria that guide providers in establishing that such a duty of specific beneficence is present; dentists must meet this duty while not violating the same principle of doctor-patient confidentiality that would exist if the nonpatient were, in fact, a patient.

AB - Dentists who encounter friends or relatives who request professional opinions about oral health problems are placed in difficult positions that may impose a duty to provide some advice or intervention. Even more awkward is the situation in which a dentist recognizes a pathosis in a nonpatient who is not seeking advice. The ethical principle of beneficence may confer an obligation upon the dentist to act in a professional role even though no professional relationship exists. There are criteria that guide providers in establishing that such a duty of specific beneficence is present; dentists must meet this duty while not violating the same principle of doctor-patient confidentiality that would exist if the nonpatient were, in fact, a patient.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032152623&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032152623&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 440

EP - 444

JO - General Dentistry

JF - General Dentistry

SN - 0363-6771

IS - 5

ER -