Concordance of self-reported practice patterns of American Rhinologic Society members with the International Consensus Statement of Allergy and Rhinology: Rhinosinusitis

Charles A. Riley, Zhong Zheng, Nicholas Williams, Timothy L. Smith, Richard R. Orlandi, Abtin Tabaee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The 2016 International Consensus Statement on Allergy and Rhinology: Rhinosinusitis (ICAR:RS) is a collaborative distillation of available research and consensus recommendations for the management for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). However, implementation of the ICAR:RS recommendations in the reality of clinical practice is not clearly defined. Methods: An anonymous, web-based survey of the American Rhinologic Society membership was performed in October, 2018. Respondents were asked about the frequency that they recommended the various treatments reviewed in ICAR:RS in the context of medical management for CRS. A 7-point Likert-type scale assessed the frequency of treatment patterns. Results: A total of 140 members completed the survey (response rate 11.9%). Seventy-two (51.4%) were in practice for 0 to 15 years, 61 (43.6%) completed a rhinology fellowship, and 73 (52.1%) worked in private practice. Disparate treatment patterns were reported for each of the therapies assessed for CRS, including those that were “recommended” or “recommended against” in ICAR:RS. Members with <15 years of experience were more likely to use nasal saline irrigation. Fellowship-trained respondents reported a greater likelihood of using nasal saline irrigation and aspirin desensitization (for patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease). Practitioners in academic medicine were more likely to utilize aspirin desensitization than those in private practice. Surgeons performing >100 sinus surgeries per year were more likely to use topical antibiotics. Conclusion: The range of reported treatment patterns identified in this study despite the availability of the ICAR:RS recommendations may suggest the need for improved standardization of CRS management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)665-672
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Forum of Allergy and Rhinology
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

Keywords

  • medical therapy of chronic rhinosinusitis
  • sinusitis
  • topical therapy for chronic rhinosinusitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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