Comparing the serum triglyceride response to high-dose supplementation with either DHA or EPA among individuals with increased cardiovascular risk: The ComparED study

Janie Allaire, Cécile Vors, William Harris, Kristina Harris Jackson, André Tchernof, Patrick Couture, Benoît Lamarche

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies show that the reduction in serum triglyceride concentrations with long-chain omega-3 fatty acid supplementation is highly variable among individuals. The objectives of this study were to compare the proportions of individuals whose triglyceride concentrations are lowered after high-dose docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and to identify predictors of the response to both modalities. In a double-blind controlled crossover study, 154 men and women were randomized to three supplemented phases of 10 weeks each: 1) 2.7g/d of DHA, 2) 2.7g/d of EPA and 3) 3g/d of corn oil, separated by nine-week washouts. As secondary analyses, the mean intra-individual variation in triglyceride was calculated using the standard deviation from the mean of four off-treatment samples. The response remained within the intra-individual variation (±0.25 mmol/L) in 47% and 57% of participants after DHA and EPA respectively. Although there was a greater proportion of participants with a reduction greater than 0.25 mmol/L after DHA than after EPA (45% vs. 32%, P < 0.001), the mean triglyceride reduction was comparable between groups (-0.59±0.04 vs. -0.57±0.05 mmol/L). Participants with a reduction greater than 0.25 mmol/L after both DHA and EPA had higher non-HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride and insulin concentrations compared with other responders at baseline (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, supplementation with 2.7g/d of DHA or EPA has no meaningful effect on triglyceride concentrations in a large proportion of individuals with normal mean triglyceride concentrations at baseline. Although DHA lowers triglyceride in a greater proportion of individuals than EPA, the magnitude of the triglyceride lowering among them is similar.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Triglycerides
Serum
Corn Oil
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Cross-Over Studies
Cholesterol
Insulin

Keywords

  • DHA
  • EPA
  • intra-individual
  • triglycerides
  • variability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Comparing the serum triglyceride response to high-dose supplementation with either DHA or EPA among individuals with increased cardiovascular risk : The ComparED study. / Allaire, Janie; Vors, Cécile; Harris, William; Jackson, Kristina Harris; Tchernof, André; Couture, Patrick; Lamarche, Benoît.

In: British Journal of Nutrition, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allaire, Janie ; Vors, Cécile ; Harris, William ; Jackson, Kristina Harris ; Tchernof, André ; Couture, Patrick ; Lamarche, Benoît. / Comparing the serum triglyceride response to high-dose supplementation with either DHA or EPA among individuals with increased cardiovascular risk : The ComparED study. In: British Journal of Nutrition. 2019.
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