Comparing the serum triglyceride response to high-dose supplementation with either DHA or EPA among individuals with increased cardiovascular risk

The ComparED study

Janie Allaire, Cécile Vors, William Harris, Kristina Harris Jackson, André Tchernof, Patrick Couture, Benoît Lamarche

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Studies show that the reduction in serum triglyceride concentrations with long-chain omega-3 fatty acid supplementation is highly variable among individuals. The objectives of this study were to compare the proportions of individuals whose triglyceride concentrations are lowered after high-dose docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and to identify predictors of the response to both modalities. In a double-blind controlled crossover study, 154 men and women were randomized to three supplemented phases of 10 weeks each: 1) 2.7g/d of DHA, 2) 2.7g/d of EPA and 3) 3g/d of corn oil, separated by nine-week washouts. As secondary analyses, the mean intra-individual variation in triglyceride was calculated using the standard deviation from the mean of four off-treatment samples. The response remained within the intra-individual variation (±0.25 mmol/L) in 47% and 57% of participants after DHA and EPA respectively. Although there was a greater proportion of participants with a reduction greater than 0.25 mmol/L after DHA than after EPA (45% vs. 32%, P < 0.001), the mean triglyceride reduction was comparable between groups (-0.59±0.04 vs. -0.57±0.05 mmol/L). Participants with a reduction greater than 0.25 mmol/L after both DHA and EPA had higher non-HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride and insulin concentrations compared with other responders at baseline (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, supplementation with 2.7g/d of DHA or EPA has no meaningful effect on triglyceride concentrations in a large proportion of individuals with normal mean triglyceride concentrations at baseline. Although DHA lowers triglyceride in a greater proportion of individuals than EPA, the magnitude of the triglyceride lowering among them is similar.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Triglycerides
Serum
Corn Oil
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Cross-Over Studies
Cholesterol
Insulin

Keywords

  • DHA
  • EPA
  • intra-individual
  • triglycerides
  • variability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Comparing the serum triglyceride response to high-dose supplementation with either DHA or EPA among individuals with increased cardiovascular risk : The ComparED study. / Allaire, Janie; Vors, Cécile; Harris, William; Jackson, Kristina Harris; Tchernof, André; Couture, Patrick; Lamarche, Benoît.

In: British Journal of Nutrition, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allaire, Janie ; Vors, Cécile ; Harris, William ; Jackson, Kristina Harris ; Tchernof, André ; Couture, Patrick ; Lamarche, Benoît. / Comparing the serum triglyceride response to high-dose supplementation with either DHA or EPA among individuals with increased cardiovascular risk : The ComparED study. In: British Journal of Nutrition. 2019.
@article{fe4efa3842c54902b254211f7f33c146,
title = "Comparing the serum triglyceride response to high-dose supplementation with either DHA or EPA among individuals with increased cardiovascular risk: The ComparED study",
abstract = "Studies show that the reduction in serum triglyceride concentrations with long-chain omega-3 fatty acid supplementation is highly variable among individuals. The objectives of this study were to compare the proportions of individuals whose triglyceride concentrations are lowered after high-dose docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and to identify predictors of the response to both modalities. In a double-blind controlled crossover study, 154 men and women were randomized to three supplemented phases of 10 weeks each: 1) 2.7g/d of DHA, 2) 2.7g/d of EPA and 3) 3g/d of corn oil, separated by nine-week washouts. As secondary analyses, the mean intra-individual variation in triglyceride was calculated using the standard deviation from the mean of four off-treatment samples. The response remained within the intra-individual variation (±0.25 mmol/L) in 47{\%} and 57{\%} of participants after DHA and EPA respectively. Although there was a greater proportion of participants with a reduction greater than 0.25 mmol/L after DHA than after EPA (45{\%} vs. 32{\%}, P < 0.001), the mean triglyceride reduction was comparable between groups (-0.59±0.04 vs. -0.57±0.05 mmol/L). Participants with a reduction greater than 0.25 mmol/L after both DHA and EPA had higher non-HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride and insulin concentrations compared with other responders at baseline (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, supplementation with 2.7g/d of DHA or EPA has no meaningful effect on triglyceride concentrations in a large proportion of individuals with normal mean triglyceride concentrations at baseline. Although DHA lowers triglyceride in a greater proportion of individuals than EPA, the magnitude of the triglyceride lowering among them is similar.",
keywords = "DHA, EPA, intra-individual, triglycerides, variability",
author = "Janie Allaire and C{\'e}cile Vors and William Harris and Jackson, {Kristina Harris} and Andr{\'e} Tchernof and Patrick Couture and Beno{\^i}t Lamarche",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S0007114519000552",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "British Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0007-1145",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparing the serum triglyceride response to high-dose supplementation with either DHA or EPA among individuals with increased cardiovascular risk

T2 - The ComparED study

AU - Allaire, Janie

AU - Vors, Cécile

AU - Harris, William

AU - Jackson, Kristina Harris

AU - Tchernof, André

AU - Couture, Patrick

AU - Lamarche, Benoît

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Studies show that the reduction in serum triglyceride concentrations with long-chain omega-3 fatty acid supplementation is highly variable among individuals. The objectives of this study were to compare the proportions of individuals whose triglyceride concentrations are lowered after high-dose docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and to identify predictors of the response to both modalities. In a double-blind controlled crossover study, 154 men and women were randomized to three supplemented phases of 10 weeks each: 1) 2.7g/d of DHA, 2) 2.7g/d of EPA and 3) 3g/d of corn oil, separated by nine-week washouts. As secondary analyses, the mean intra-individual variation in triglyceride was calculated using the standard deviation from the mean of four off-treatment samples. The response remained within the intra-individual variation (±0.25 mmol/L) in 47% and 57% of participants after DHA and EPA respectively. Although there was a greater proportion of participants with a reduction greater than 0.25 mmol/L after DHA than after EPA (45% vs. 32%, P < 0.001), the mean triglyceride reduction was comparable between groups (-0.59±0.04 vs. -0.57±0.05 mmol/L). Participants with a reduction greater than 0.25 mmol/L after both DHA and EPA had higher non-HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride and insulin concentrations compared with other responders at baseline (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, supplementation with 2.7g/d of DHA or EPA has no meaningful effect on triglyceride concentrations in a large proportion of individuals with normal mean triglyceride concentrations at baseline. Although DHA lowers triglyceride in a greater proportion of individuals than EPA, the magnitude of the triglyceride lowering among them is similar.

AB - Studies show that the reduction in serum triglyceride concentrations with long-chain omega-3 fatty acid supplementation is highly variable among individuals. The objectives of this study were to compare the proportions of individuals whose triglyceride concentrations are lowered after high-dose docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and to identify predictors of the response to both modalities. In a double-blind controlled crossover study, 154 men and women were randomized to three supplemented phases of 10 weeks each: 1) 2.7g/d of DHA, 2) 2.7g/d of EPA and 3) 3g/d of corn oil, separated by nine-week washouts. As secondary analyses, the mean intra-individual variation in triglyceride was calculated using the standard deviation from the mean of four off-treatment samples. The response remained within the intra-individual variation (±0.25 mmol/L) in 47% and 57% of participants after DHA and EPA respectively. Although there was a greater proportion of participants with a reduction greater than 0.25 mmol/L after DHA than after EPA (45% vs. 32%, P < 0.001), the mean triglyceride reduction was comparable between groups (-0.59±0.04 vs. -0.57±0.05 mmol/L). Participants with a reduction greater than 0.25 mmol/L after both DHA and EPA had higher non-HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride and insulin concentrations compared with other responders at baseline (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, supplementation with 2.7g/d of DHA or EPA has no meaningful effect on triglyceride concentrations in a large proportion of individuals with normal mean triglyceride concentrations at baseline. Although DHA lowers triglyceride in a greater proportion of individuals than EPA, the magnitude of the triglyceride lowering among them is similar.

KW - DHA

KW - EPA

KW - intra-individual

KW - triglycerides

KW - variability

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062887731&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85062887731&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0007114519000552

DO - 10.1017/S0007114519000552

M3 - Article

JO - British Journal of Nutrition

JF - British Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0007-1145

ER -