Colorectal polyposis and inherited colorectal cancer syndromes

Raphael M. Byrne, Vassiliki Tsikitis

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The majority of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases are sporadic, with hereditary factors contributing to approximately 35% of CRC cases. Less than 5% of CRC is associated with a known genetic syndrome. Although adenomatous polyposis syndromes, hamartomatous polyposis syndromes, and those previously classified as non-polyposis CRC syndromes are quite rare, it is important for clinicians to know the characteristics of each syndrome and to understand the differences in cancer risks between the different conditions. This information is very important when treatment and surveillance plans are formulated for each individual patient.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)24-34
    Number of pages11
    JournalAnnals of Gastroenterology
    Volume31
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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    Colorectal Neoplasms
    Neoplasms
    Therapeutics

    Keywords

    • Adenomatous polyposis syndromes
    • Cancer risk
    • Colorectal cancer
    • Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes
    • Nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndromes

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Gastroenterology

    Cite this

    Colorectal polyposis and inherited colorectal cancer syndromes. / Byrne, Raphael M.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki.

    In: Annals of Gastroenterology, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 24-34.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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