Colorectal cancer screening among American Indians in a Pacific Northwest tribe: Cowlitz tribal BRFSS project, 2009-2010

Annika G. Maly, Tessa L. Steel, Rongwei Fu, David A. Lieberman, Thomas M. Becker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is low among American Indians (AIs). We describe the demographics, health status, prevalence of modifiable CRC risk factors, and use of CRC screening modalities in a Pacific Northwest AI tribe. Methods. We conducted a survey among Cowlitz tribal members using a Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) questionnaire. We analyzed demographic, health status, behavioral risk factor, and CRC screening variables. Using the Washington State 2010 BRFSS, we compared tribal members with non-Hispanic white (NHW) people. We used logistic regression to examine factors associated with CRC screening for tribal members. Results. A greater proportion of tribal members than NHW people reported living below the federal poverty level (12% vs. 7%, p50.013). A greater proportion of tribal members than NHW people aged ≥50 years had poor self-reported health (27% vs. 16%, p50.006) and were without health insurance (12% vs. 6%, p50.004). A greater proportion of tribal members than NHW people had a fecal occult blood test within the past year (20% vs. 13%, p50.006). Being 60-69 years of age (odds ratio [OR] 5 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4, 4.9), ≥70 years of age (OR52.2, 95% CI 1.1, 4.5), and having a personal health-care provider (OR53.7, 95% CI 1.4, 9.6) were associated with increased screening adherence in tribal members. Conclusion. Data from the Cowlitz Tribal BRFSS demonstrate that members are receiving CRC screening in the same proportions as NHW people despite lower sociodemographic and health status indicators among members. Unique characteristics of the tribe likely contribute to this finding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)280-288
Number of pages9
JournalPublic health reports
Volume129
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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