Circadian misalignment in mood disturbances

Alfred Lewy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent refinements in methodology allow chronobiological researchers to answer the following questions: is there circadian misalignment in sleep and mood disturbances, and, if so, is it of the phase-advance or phase-delay type? Measurement of the dim light melatonin onset-to-midsleep interval, or phase-angle difference, in sleep and mood disorders should answer these questions. Although the phase-advance hypothesis of affective disorders was formulated three decades ago, recent studies suggest that many, if not all, mood disturbances have a circadian misalignment component of the phase-delay type, operationally defined as a delay in the dim light melatonin onset relative to the sleep/wake cycle. Phase-delayed disorders can be treated with bright light in the morning and/or low-dose melatonin in the afternoon/evening. Phase-advanced disorders can be treated with bright light in the evening and/or low-dose melatonin in the morning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-465
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Psychiatry Reports
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009

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Melatonin
Light
Mood Disorders
Sleep
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Circadian misalignment in mood disturbances. / Lewy, Alfred.

In: Current Psychiatry Reports, Vol. 11, No. 6, 12.2009, p. 459-465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lewy, Alfred. / Circadian misalignment in mood disturbances. In: Current Psychiatry Reports. 2009 ; Vol. 11, No. 6. pp. 459-465.
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