Characteristic patterns of inter- and intra-hemispheric metabolic connectivity in patients with stable and progressive mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease

For the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The change in hypometabolism affects the regional links in the brain network. Here, to understand the underlying brain metabolic network deficits during the early stage and disease evolution of AD (Alzheimer disease), we applied correlation analysis to identify the metabolic connectivity patterns using 18F-FDG PET data for NC (normal control), sMCI (stable MCI), pMCI (progressive MCI) and AD, and explore the inter- and intra-hemispheric connectivity between anatomically-defined brain regions. Regions extracted from 90 anatomical structures were used to construct the matrix for measuring the inter- and intra-hemispheric connectivity. The brain connectivity patterns from the metabolic network show a decreasing trend of inter- and intra-hemispheric connections for NC, sMCI, pMCI and AD. Connection of temporal to the frontal or occipital regions is a characteristic pattern for conversion of NC to MCI, and the density of links in the parietal-occipital network is a differential pattern between sMCI and pMCI. The reduction pattern of inter and intra-hemispheric brain connectivity in the metabolic network depends on the disease stages, and is with a decreasing trend with respect to disease severity. Both frontal-occipital and parietal-occipital connectivity patterns in the metabolic network using 18F-FDG PET are the key feature for differentiating disease groups in AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number13807
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Alzheimer Disease
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Brain
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Occipital Lobe
Cognitive Dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Characteristic patterns of inter- and intra-hemispheric metabolic connectivity in patients with stable and progressive mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. / For the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 8, No. 1, 13807, 01.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The change in hypometabolism affects the regional links in the brain network. Here, to understand the underlying brain metabolic network deficits during the early stage and disease evolution of AD (Alzheimer disease), we applied correlation analysis to identify the metabolic connectivity patterns using 18F-FDG PET data for NC (normal control), sMCI (stable MCI), pMCI (progressive MCI) and AD, and explore the inter- and intra-hemispheric connectivity between anatomically-defined brain regions. Regions extracted from 90 anatomical structures were used to construct the matrix for measuring the inter- and intra-hemispheric connectivity. The brain connectivity patterns from the metabolic network show a decreasing trend of inter- and intra-hemispheric connections for NC, sMCI, pMCI and AD. Connection of temporal to the frontal or occipital regions is a characteristic pattern for conversion of NC to MCI, and the density of links in the parietal-occipital network is a differential pattern between sMCI and pMCI. The reduction pattern of inter and intra-hemispheric brain connectivity in the metabolic network depends on the disease stages, and is with a decreasing trend with respect to disease severity. Both frontal-occipital and parietal-occipital connectivity patterns in the metabolic network using 18F-FDG PET are the key feature for differentiating disease groups in AD.",
author = "{For the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative} and Huang, {Sheng Yao} and Hsu, {Jung Lung} and Lin, {Kun Ju} and Liu, {Ho Ling} and Wey, {Shiaw Pying} and Hsiao, {Ing Tsung} and Michael Weiner and Paul Aisen and Ronald Petersen and Jack, {Clifford R.} and William Jagust and Trojanowki, {John Q.} and Toga, {Arthur W.} and Laurel Beckett and Green, {Robert C.} and Saykin, {Andrew J.} and John Morris and Shaw, {Leslie M.} and Enchi Liu and Tom Montine and Thomas, {Ronald G.} and Michael Donohue and Sarah Walter and Devon Gessert and Tamie Sather and Gus Jiminez and Danielle Harvey and Matthew Bernstein and Nick Fox and Paul Thompson and Norbert Schuff and Charles DeCarli and Bret Borowski and Jeff Gunter and Matt Senjem and Prashanthi Vemuri and David Jones and Kejal Kantarci and Chad Ward and Koeppe, {Robert A.} and Norm Foster and Reiman, {Eric M.} and Kewei Chen and Chet Mathis and Susan Landau and Cairns, {Nigel J.} and Erin Householder and Reinwald, {Lisa Taylor} and Jeffrey Kaye and Joseph Quinn",
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