Carotenemia in normal‐weight bulimia: A finding unrelated to other physical manifestations of the syndrome

Arthur Jaffe, Lauren G. McAliley, Lynn Singer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carotenemia, well described in eating disorders, is considered a marker for one or another pathophysiologic process occurring during the disease. We studied 17 adolescent, normal‐weight women with bulimia, 11 of whom were determined clinically to be candidates for outpatient treatment, and 6 of whom were recommended for hospitalization. The outpatient group had an elevated serum carotene level (mean = 309.0 ± 92.0 μg/dl), whereas the inpatient group had a normal level (mean = 164.8 ± 59.2 μg/dl; t = 3.92, p = 0.002). Our data do not support the relationship of carotenemia to malnutrition, menstrual dysfunction, or any other factor associated with the manifestations of eating disorders. We suggest that carotenemia may be an indicator of some homeostatic mechanism activated in response to the disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)749-755
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume6
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bulimia
Outpatients
Carotenoids
Malnutrition
Inpatients
Hospitalization
Serum
Feeding and Eating Disorders
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Carotenemia in normal‐weight bulimia : A finding unrelated to other physical manifestations of the syndrome. / Jaffe, Arthur; McAliley, Lauren G.; Singer, Lynn.

In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, Vol. 6, No. 6, 1987, p. 749-755.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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