Can a back pain e-mail discussion group improve health status and lower health care costs? A randomized study

Kate R. Lorig, Diana D. Laurent, Richard (Rick) Deyo, Margaret E. Marnell, Marian A. Minor, Philip L. Ritter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

154 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Given the high health care utilization, limited evidence for the effectiveness of back pain interventions, and the proliferation of e-mail health discussion groups, this study seeks to determine if the Internet can be used to improve health status and health care utilization for people with chronic back pain. Methods: Randomized controlled trial. Participants included 580 people from 49 states with chronic back pain having at least 1 outpatient visit in the past year, no "red-flag" symptoms, and access to e-mail. Major exclusion criteria included continuous back pain for more than 90 days causing major activity intolerance and/or receiving disability payments. Intervention: Closed, moderated, e-mail discussion group. Participants also received a book and videotape about back pain. Controls received a subscription to a non-health-related magazine of their choice. Main Outcome Measures: Pain, disability, role function, health distress, and health care utilization. Results: At 1-year treatment, subjects compared with controls demonstrated improvements in pain (P=.045), disability (P=.02), role function (P=.007), and health distress (P=.001). Physician visits for the past 6 months declined by 1.5 visits for the treatment group and by 0.65 visits for the control group (P=.07). Mean hospital days declined nearly 0.20 days for the treated group vs and increased 0.04 days for the control group (P=.24). Conclusions: An e-mail discussion group can positively affect health status and possibly health care utilization. It may have a place in the treatment of chronic recurrent back pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)792-796
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume162
Issue number7
StatePublished - Apr 8 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Postal Service
Back Pain
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Health Care Costs
Health Status
Chronic Pain
Health
Pain
Control Groups
Videotape Recording
Internet
Outpatients
Therapeutics
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Lorig, K. R., Laurent, D. D., Deyo, R. R., Marnell, M. E., Minor, M. A., & Ritter, P. L. (2002). Can a back pain e-mail discussion group improve health status and lower health care costs? A randomized study. Archives of Internal Medicine, 162(7), 792-796.

Can a back pain e-mail discussion group improve health status and lower health care costs? A randomized study. / Lorig, Kate R.; Laurent, Diana D.; Deyo, Richard (Rick); Marnell, Margaret E.; Minor, Marian A.; Ritter, Philip L.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 162, No. 7, 08.04.2002, p. 792-796.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lorig, KR, Laurent, DD, Deyo, RR, Marnell, ME, Minor, MA & Ritter, PL 2002, 'Can a back pain e-mail discussion group improve health status and lower health care costs? A randomized study', Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 162, no. 7, pp. 792-796.
Lorig, Kate R. ; Laurent, Diana D. ; Deyo, Richard (Rick) ; Marnell, Margaret E. ; Minor, Marian A. ; Ritter, Philip L. / Can a back pain e-mail discussion group improve health status and lower health care costs? A randomized study. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 2002 ; Vol. 162, No. 7. pp. 792-796.
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