Caenorhabditis elegans-based screen identifies Salmonella virulence factors required for conserved host-pathogen interactions

Jennifer L. Tenor, Beth A. McCormick, Frederick M. Ausubel, Alejandro Aballay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

105 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A Caenorhabditis elegans-Salmonella enterica host-pathogen model was used to identify both novel and previously known S. enterica virulence factors (HilA, HilD, InvH, SptP, RhuM, Spi4-F, PipA, VsdA, RepC, Sb25, RfaL, GmhA, LeuO, CstA, and RecC), including several related to the type III secretion system (TTSS) encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Mutants corresponding to presumptive novel virulence-related genes exhibited diminished ability to invade epithelial cells and/or to induce polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration in a tissue culture model of mammalian enteropathogenesis. When expressed in C. elegans intestinal cells, the S. enterica TTSS-exported effector protein SptP inhibited a conserved p38 MAPK signaling pathway and suppressed the diminished pathogenicity phenotype of an S. enterica sptP mutant. These results show that C. elegans is an attractive model to study the interaction between Salmonella effector proteins and components of the innate immune response, in part because there is a remarkable overlap between Salmonella virulence factors required for human and nematode pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1018-1024
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume14
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 8 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Host-Pathogen Interactions
Salmonella
Salmonella enterica
host-pathogen relationships
Caenorhabditis elegans
Virulence Factors
Pathogens
virulence
type III secretion system
Virulence
pathogenicity islands
Genomic Islands
Tissue culture
mutants
p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
mitogen-activated protein kinase
Innate Immunity
tissue culture
neutrophils
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Caenorhabditis elegans-based screen identifies Salmonella virulence factors required for conserved host-pathogen interactions. / Tenor, Jennifer L.; McCormick, Beth A.; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Aballay, Alejandro.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 14, No. 11, 08.06.2004, p. 1018-1024.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tenor, Jennifer L. ; McCormick, Beth A. ; Ausubel, Frederick M. ; Aballay, Alejandro. / Caenorhabditis elegans-based screen identifies Salmonella virulence factors required for conserved host-pathogen interactions. In: Current Biology. 2004 ; Vol. 14, No. 11. pp. 1018-1024.
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