Binge drinking and family history of alcoholism are associated with an altered developmental trajectory of impulsive choice across adolescence

Scott A. Jones, Joel S. Steele, Bonnie Nagel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To test whether binge drinking, the density of familial alcoholism (FHD) and their interaction are associated with an altered developmental trajectory of impulsive choice across adolescence, and whether more life-time drinks are associated with a greater change in impulsive choice across age. Design: Alcohol-naive adolescents, with varying degrees of FHD, were recruited as part of an ongoing longitudinal study on adolescent development, and were grouped based on whether they remained non-drinkers (n = 83) or initiated binge drinking (n = 33) during follow-up. During all visits, adolescents completed a monetary delay discounting task to measure impulsive choice. The effects of binge-drinking status, FHD and their interaction on impulsive choice across adolescence were tested. Setting: Developmental Brain Imaging Laboratory, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA. Participants: A total of 116 healthy male and female adolescents (ages 10–17 years at baseline) completed two to four visits between July 2008 and May 2016. Measurements: Discounting rates were obtained based on adolescents' preference for immediate or delayed rewards. FHD was based on parent-reported prevalence of alcohol use disorder in the participant's first- and second-degree relatives. Binge-drinking status was determined based on the number of recent binge-drinking episodes. Findings: There was a significant interaction effect of binge-drinking status and FHD on impulsive choice across age (b = 1.090, P < 0.05, β = 0.298). In adolescents who remained alcohol-naive, greater FHD was associated with a steeper decrease in discounting rates across adolescence (b = −0.633, P < 0.05, β = −0.173); however, this effect was not present in binge-drinkers. Furthermore, total life-time drinks predicted escalated impulsive choice (b = 0.002, P < 0.05, β = 0.295) in binge-drinking adolescents. Conclusions: A greater degree of familial alcoholism is associated with a steeper decline in impulsive choice across adolescence, but only in those who remain alcohol-naive. Meanwhile, more life-time drinks during adolescence is associated with increases in impulsive choice across age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1184-1192
Number of pages9
JournalAddiction
Volume112
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

Binge Drinking
Alcoholism
Alcohols
Adolescent Development
Reward
Neuroimaging
Longitudinal Studies
FHD

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • alcohol
  • decision-making
  • genetic
  • impulsivity
  • longitudinal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Binge drinking and family history of alcoholism are associated with an altered developmental trajectory of impulsive choice across adolescence. / Jones, Scott A.; Steele, Joel S.; Nagel, Bonnie.

In: Addiction, Vol. 112, No. 7, 01.07.2017, p. 1184-1192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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