Autoaggregation response of Fusobacterium nucleatum

Justin Merritt, Guoqing Niu, Toshinori Okinaga, Felicia Qi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fusobacterium nucleatum is a gram-negative oral bacterial species associated with periodontal disease progression. This species is perhaps best known for its ability to adhere to a vast array of other bacteria and eukaryotic cells. Numerous studies of F. nucleatum have examined various coaggregation partners and inhibitors, but it is largely unknown whether these interactions induce a particular genetic response. We tested coaggregation between F. nucleatum ATCC strain 25586 and various species of Streptococcus in the presence of a semidefined growth medium containing saliva. We found that this condition could support efficient coaggregation but, surprisingly, also stimulated a similar degree of autoaggregation. We further characterized the autoaggregation response, since few reports have examined this in F. nucleatum. After screening several common coaggregation inhibitors, we identified L-lysine as a competitive inhibitor of autoaggregation. We performed a microarray analysis of the planktonic versus autoaggregated cells and found nearly 100 genes that were affected after only about 60 min of aggregation. We tested a subset of these genes via real-time reverse transcription-PCR and confirmed the validity of the microarray results. Some of these genes were also found to be inducible in cell pellets created by centrifugation. Based upon these data, it appears that autoaggregation activates a genetic program that may be utilized for growth in a high cell density environment, such as the oral biofilm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7725-7733
Number of pages9
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume75
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fusobacterium nucleatum
inhibitor
gene
mouth
saliva
Genes
biofilm
genes
Streptococcus
Periodontal Diseases
Eukaryotic Cells
cells
Microarray Analysis
Biofilms
Growth
Centrifugation
Saliva
disease course
Reproducibility of Results
centrifugation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Biotechnology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Autoaggregation response of Fusobacterium nucleatum. / Merritt, Justin; Niu, Guoqing; Okinaga, Toshinori; Qi, Felicia.

In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 75, No. 24, 12.2009, p. 7725-7733.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Merritt, Justin ; Niu, Guoqing ; Okinaga, Toshinori ; Qi, Felicia. / Autoaggregation response of Fusobacterium nucleatum. In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 2009 ; Vol. 75, No. 24. pp. 7725-7733.
@article{a8045105fad4420395d9ac5fd33f768f,
title = "Autoaggregation response of Fusobacterium nucleatum",
abstract = "Fusobacterium nucleatum is a gram-negative oral bacterial species associated with periodontal disease progression. This species is perhaps best known for its ability to adhere to a vast array of other bacteria and eukaryotic cells. Numerous studies of F. nucleatum have examined various coaggregation partners and inhibitors, but it is largely unknown whether these interactions induce a particular genetic response. We tested coaggregation between F. nucleatum ATCC strain 25586 and various species of Streptococcus in the presence of a semidefined growth medium containing saliva. We found that this condition could support efficient coaggregation but, surprisingly, also stimulated a similar degree of autoaggregation. We further characterized the autoaggregation response, since few reports have examined this in F. nucleatum. After screening several common coaggregation inhibitors, we identified L-lysine as a competitive inhibitor of autoaggregation. We performed a microarray analysis of the planktonic versus autoaggregated cells and found nearly 100 genes that were affected after only about 60 min of aggregation. We tested a subset of these genes via real-time reverse transcription-PCR and confirmed the validity of the microarray results. Some of these genes were also found to be inducible in cell pellets created by centrifugation. Based upon these data, it appears that autoaggregation activates a genetic program that may be utilized for growth in a high cell density environment, such as the oral biofilm.",
author = "Justin Merritt and Guoqing Niu and Toshinori Okinaga and Felicia Qi",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1128/AEM.00916-09",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "75",
pages = "7725--7733",
journal = "Applied and Environmental Microbiology",
issn = "0099-2240",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "24",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Autoaggregation response of Fusobacterium nucleatum

AU - Merritt, Justin

AU - Niu, Guoqing

AU - Okinaga, Toshinori

AU - Qi, Felicia

PY - 2009/12

Y1 - 2009/12

N2 - Fusobacterium nucleatum is a gram-negative oral bacterial species associated with periodontal disease progression. This species is perhaps best known for its ability to adhere to a vast array of other bacteria and eukaryotic cells. Numerous studies of F. nucleatum have examined various coaggregation partners and inhibitors, but it is largely unknown whether these interactions induce a particular genetic response. We tested coaggregation between F. nucleatum ATCC strain 25586 and various species of Streptococcus in the presence of a semidefined growth medium containing saliva. We found that this condition could support efficient coaggregation but, surprisingly, also stimulated a similar degree of autoaggregation. We further characterized the autoaggregation response, since few reports have examined this in F. nucleatum. After screening several common coaggregation inhibitors, we identified L-lysine as a competitive inhibitor of autoaggregation. We performed a microarray analysis of the planktonic versus autoaggregated cells and found nearly 100 genes that were affected after only about 60 min of aggregation. We tested a subset of these genes via real-time reverse transcription-PCR and confirmed the validity of the microarray results. Some of these genes were also found to be inducible in cell pellets created by centrifugation. Based upon these data, it appears that autoaggregation activates a genetic program that may be utilized for growth in a high cell density environment, such as the oral biofilm.

AB - Fusobacterium nucleatum is a gram-negative oral bacterial species associated with periodontal disease progression. This species is perhaps best known for its ability to adhere to a vast array of other bacteria and eukaryotic cells. Numerous studies of F. nucleatum have examined various coaggregation partners and inhibitors, but it is largely unknown whether these interactions induce a particular genetic response. We tested coaggregation between F. nucleatum ATCC strain 25586 and various species of Streptococcus in the presence of a semidefined growth medium containing saliva. We found that this condition could support efficient coaggregation but, surprisingly, also stimulated a similar degree of autoaggregation. We further characterized the autoaggregation response, since few reports have examined this in F. nucleatum. After screening several common coaggregation inhibitors, we identified L-lysine as a competitive inhibitor of autoaggregation. We performed a microarray analysis of the planktonic versus autoaggregated cells and found nearly 100 genes that were affected after only about 60 min of aggregation. We tested a subset of these genes via real-time reverse transcription-PCR and confirmed the validity of the microarray results. Some of these genes were also found to be inducible in cell pellets created by centrifugation. Based upon these data, it appears that autoaggregation activates a genetic program that may be utilized for growth in a high cell density environment, such as the oral biofilm.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=73249147604&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=73249147604&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/AEM.00916-09

DO - 10.1128/AEM.00916-09

M3 - Article

C2 - 19837836

AN - SCOPUS:73249147604

VL - 75

SP - 7725

EP - 7733

JO - Applied and Environmental Microbiology

JF - Applied and Environmental Microbiology

SN - 0099-2240

IS - 24

ER -