Associations of Pregnancy After Bariatric Surgery with Long-Term Weight Trajectories and Birth Weight: LABS-2 Study

Curtis S. Harrod, Miriam R. Elman, Kimberly K. Vesco, Bruce M. Wolfe, James E. Mitchell, Walter J. Pories, Alfons Pomp, Janne Boone-Heinonen, Jonathan Q. Purnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to examine whether pregnancy following bariatric surgery affects long-term maternal weight change and offspring birth weight. Methods: Using data from the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS)-2 study, linear regression was used to evaluate percent change in total body weight over a 5-year follow-up period among reproductive-aged women who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding as well as evaluate the association of bariatric procedure type and offspring birth weight. Results: Of 727 women with preoperative age of 36.1 (6.3) years (mean [SD]) and BMI of 46.9 (7.0) kg/m2, 80 (11%) reported at least one pregnancy. After adjusting for covariates, percent change in total body weight was not significantly different between women who became pregnant and those who did not during a 5-year follow-up period (β = 2.02; 95% CI: −1.03 to 5.07; P = 0.19). Additionally, mean birth weight was not significantly different between mothers who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass versus laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (P = 0.99). Conclusions: Postoperative pregnancy did not diminish long-term weight loss in women in the LABS-2 study. The finding of comparable weight loss is relevant for providers counseling women of reproductive age on weight-loss expectations and family planning following bariatric surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalObesity
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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