Association Between COVID-19 and Mortality in Hip Fracture Surgery in the National COVID Cohort Collaborative (N3C): A Retrospective Cohort Study

Eli B. Levitt, David A. Patch, Scott Mabry, Alfredo Terrero, Byron Jaeger, Melissa A. Haendel, Christopher G. Chute, Jonathan H. Quade, Brent Ponce, Steven Theiss, Clay A. Spitler, Joey P. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This study investigated the outcomes of coronavirus disease (COVID-19)-positive patients undergoing hip fracture surgery using a national database. METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study comparing hip fracture surgery outcomes between COVID-19 positive and negative matched cohorts from 46 sites in the United States. Patients aged 65 and older with hip fracture surgery between March 15 and December 31, 2020, were included. The main outcomes were 30-day all-cause mortality and all-cause mortality. RESULTS: In this national study that included 3303 adults with hip fracture surgery, the 30-day mortality was 14.6% with COVID-19-positive versus 3.8% in COVID-19-negative, a notable difference. The all-cause mortality for hip fracture surgery was 27.0% in the COVID-19-positive group during the study period. DICUSSION: We found higher incidence of all-cause mortality in patients with versus without diagnosis of COVID-19 after undergoing hip fracture surgery. The mortality in hip fracture surgery in this national analysis was lower than other local and regional reports. The medical community can use this information to guide the management of hip fracture patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Global Research and Reviews
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 4 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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