Assessment of tinnitus: measurement of treatment outcomes

M. B. Meikle, B. J. Stewart, Susan Griest, William Martin, James Henry, H. B. Abrams, R. McArdle, C. W. Newman, S. A. Sandridge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a wide range of assessment techniques for tinnitus, but no consensus has developed concerning how best to measure either the presenting features of tinnitus or the effects of tinnitus treatments. Standardization of reliable and valid tinnitus measures would provide many advantages including improving the uniformity of diagnostic and screening criteria between clinics and facilitating comparison of treatment outcomes obtained at different sites. This chapter attempts to clarify issues involved in developing self-report questionnaires for the assessment of tinnitus. While the tinnitus questionnaires that are currently available provide valuable information on which to base diagnostic and screening decisions, they were not originally developed in such a way as to maximize their sensitivity to treatment-related changes in tinnitus. As a result, their construct validity for measuring treatment benefit has not received appropriate attention. In this paper, special emphasis is devoted to the use of effect sizes as an estimate of the ability of questionnaires (and their individual items) to measure changes associated with treatment. We discuss the criteria relevant to evaluating the effectiveness of a questionnaire for diagnostic purposes vs. for treatment-evaluation purposes, and we present a detailed illustration of how the various criteria have been applied in a recent questionnaire development effort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-521
Number of pages11
JournalProgress in Brain Research
Volume166
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Tinnitus
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • self-assessment measures
  • standardized tinnitus measures
  • tinnitus functional effects
  • tinnitus outcome measures
  • tinnitus questionnaires
  • tinnitus severity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Meikle, M. B., Stewart, B. J., Griest, S., Martin, W., Henry, J., Abrams, H. B., ... Sandridge, S. A. (2007). Assessment of tinnitus: measurement of treatment outcomes. Progress in Brain Research, 166, 511-521. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0079-6123(07)66049-X

Assessment of tinnitus : measurement of treatment outcomes. / Meikle, M. B.; Stewart, B. J.; Griest, Susan; Martin, William; Henry, James; Abrams, H. B.; McArdle, R.; Newman, C. W.; Sandridge, S. A.

In: Progress in Brain Research, Vol. 166, 2007, p. 511-521.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meikle, MB, Stewart, BJ, Griest, S, Martin, W, Henry, J, Abrams, HB, McArdle, R, Newman, CW & Sandridge, SA 2007, 'Assessment of tinnitus: measurement of treatment outcomes', Progress in Brain Research, vol. 166, pp. 511-521. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0079-6123(07)66049-X
Meikle, M. B. ; Stewart, B. J. ; Griest, Susan ; Martin, William ; Henry, James ; Abrams, H. B. ; McArdle, R. ; Newman, C. W. ; Sandridge, S. A. / Assessment of tinnitus : measurement of treatment outcomes. In: Progress in Brain Research. 2007 ; Vol. 166. pp. 511-521.
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