Androgen receptor polymorphisms and the incidence of prostate cancer

Chu Chen, Najib Lamharzi, Noel S. Weiss, Ruth Etzioni, Douglas A. Dightman, Matt Barnett, Dante DiTommaso, Gary Goodman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The human androgen receptor gene contains polymorphic CAG and GGC repeats in exon 1. We investigated whether the number of CAG and/or GGC repeats is related to prostate cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the β Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial. Among 300 cases and 300 controls, we did not observe any increase in risk associated with fewer CAG or GGC repeats. We observed a nonsignificant decrease in risk associated with each unit of decrease in CAG length [odds ratio (OR), 0.98; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.93-1.03). Men with CAG <22 had a relative risk of prostate cancer of 0.89 (95% CI, 0.65-1.23) compared with men with CAG ≥22. There was no appreciable difference in the mean number of GGC repeats between cases and controls; the estimated change in the risk of prostate cancer associated with one fewer GGC repeat was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.88-1.06). The risk in men at or below the mean number of GGC repeats (17) was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.57-1.12). In contrast to prior reports, men with both short CAG (<22) and short GGC (≤17) repeats were not at increased risk of prostate cancer (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.32-0.98), compared with men with ≥22 CAG repeats and >17 GGC repeats. Our results do not support the hypothesis that a small number of CAG or GGC repeats in the androgen receptor gene increases a man's risk of prostate cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1033-1040
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume11
Issue number10 I
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Androgen Receptors
Prostatic Neoplasms
Incidence
Carotenoids
Vitamin A
Genes
Case-Control Studies
Exons
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Chen, C., Lamharzi, N., Weiss, N. S., Etzioni, R., Dightman, D. A., Barnett, M., ... Goodman, G. (2002). Androgen receptor polymorphisms and the incidence of prostate cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 11(10 I), 1033-1040.

Androgen receptor polymorphisms and the incidence of prostate cancer. / Chen, Chu; Lamharzi, Najib; Weiss, Noel S.; Etzioni, Ruth; Dightman, Douglas A.; Barnett, Matt; DiTommaso, Dante; Goodman, Gary.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 11, No. 10 I, 01.10.2002, p. 1033-1040.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, C, Lamharzi, N, Weiss, NS, Etzioni, R, Dightman, DA, Barnett, M, DiTommaso, D & Goodman, G 2002, 'Androgen receptor polymorphisms and the incidence of prostate cancer', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 11, no. 10 I, pp. 1033-1040.
Chen C, Lamharzi N, Weiss NS, Etzioni R, Dightman DA, Barnett M et al. Androgen receptor polymorphisms and the incidence of prostate cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2002 Oct 1;11(10 I):1033-1040.
Chen, Chu ; Lamharzi, Najib ; Weiss, Noel S. ; Etzioni, Ruth ; Dightman, Douglas A. ; Barnett, Matt ; DiTommaso, Dante ; Goodman, Gary. / Androgen receptor polymorphisms and the incidence of prostate cancer. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2002 ; Vol. 11, No. 10 I. pp. 1033-1040.
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