Androgen effects on adipose tissue architecture and function in nonhuman primates

Oleg Varlamov, Ashley E. White, Julie M. Carroll, Cynthia Bethea, Arubala Reddy, Ov Slayden, Robert W. O'Rourke, Charles Roberts

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    35 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The differential association of hypoandrogenism in men and hyperandrogenism in women with insulin resistanceandobesity suggests that androgensmayexert sex-specific effectsonadiposeand other tissues, although the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Moreover, recent studies also suggest that rodents and humans may respond differently to androgen imbalance. To achieve better insight into clinically relevant sex-specific mechanisms of androgen action, we used nonhuman primates to investigate the direct effects of gonadectomy and hormone replacement on white adipose tissue. We also employed a novel ex vivo approach that provides a convenient framework for understanding of adipose tissue physiology under a controlled tissue culture environment. In vivo androgen deprivation of males did not result in overt obesity or insulin resistance but did induce the appearance of very small, multilocular white adipocytes. Testosterone replacement restored normal cell size and a unilocular phenotype and stimulated adipogenic gene transcription and improved insulin sensitivity of male adipose tissue. Ex vivo studies demonstrated sex-specific effects of androgens on adipocyte function. Female adipose tissue treated with androgens displayed elevated basal but reduced insulin-dependent fatty acid uptake. Androgenstimulated basal uptake was greater in adipose tissue of ovariectomized females than in adipose tissue of intact females and ovariectomized females replaced with estrogen and progesterone in vivo. Collectively, these data demonstrate that androgens are essential for normal adipogenesis in males and can impair essential adipocyte functions in females, thus strengthening the experimental basis for sex-specific effects of androgens in adipose tissue.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)3100-3110
    Number of pages11
    JournalEndocrinology
    Volume153
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 2012

    Fingerprint

    Primates
    Androgens
    Adipose Tissue
    Adipocytes
    Insulin Resistance
    White Adipocytes
    Insulin
    Hyperandrogenism
    Adipogenesis
    White Adipose Tissue
    Cell Size
    Progesterone
    Testosterone
    Rodentia
    Estrogens
    Fatty Acids
    Obesity
    Hormones
    Phenotype
    Genes

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Endocrinology

    Cite this

    Androgen effects on adipose tissue architecture and function in nonhuman primates. / Varlamov, Oleg; White, Ashley E.; Carroll, Julie M.; Bethea, Cynthia; Reddy, Arubala; Slayden, Ov; O'Rourke, Robert W.; Roberts, Charles.

    In: Endocrinology, Vol. 153, No. 7, 07.2012, p. 3100-3110.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Varlamov, Oleg ; White, Ashley E. ; Carroll, Julie M. ; Bethea, Cynthia ; Reddy, Arubala ; Slayden, Ov ; O'Rourke, Robert W. ; Roberts, Charles. / Androgen effects on adipose tissue architecture and function in nonhuman primates. In: Endocrinology. 2012 ; Vol. 153, No. 7. pp. 3100-3110.
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