Analysis of pre-residency research productivity, dual degree status, and gender distribution of underrepresented minorities among a current United States radiation oncology junior resident class

Shearwood McClelland, Kristina D. Woodhouse, Jerry Jaboin, Richard C. Zellars

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Among the most competitive medical subspecialties, representation of underrepresented minorities (African–American race and/or Hispanic ethnicity) among resident trainees has historically been low compared to their United States Census general population representation. Research productivity and dual degree status may impact residency applicant competitiveness. To date, such an analysis has yet to be performed in Radiation Oncology. Methods: A list of radiation oncology residents from the graduating class of 2022 was obtained through internet searches. Demographics included were gender and dual degree status. Research productivity was calculated using the number of pre-residency peer-reviewed publications (PRP). Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 179 residents evaluated from the 2022 class, eleven (6.1%) were underrepresented minorities. Compared to the remainder of the class, underrepresented minorities had a lower proportion of men (63.6% versus 69.3%), a higher proportion of dual degrees (45.5% versus 28.6%), and a lower proportion of MD-PhD degrees (9.1% versus 17.2%). Underrepresented minorities had a higher proportion of residents with at least two PRP (72.7% versus 57.1%) and a lower proportion of residents with no PRP (18.2% versus 24.4%). None of these differences reached statistical significance (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Underrepresented minorities were comparable to the remainder of their Radiation Oncology resident class regarding gender distribution, dual degrees status, and likelihood of having at least two peer-reviewed publications cited in PubMed during the calendar year of residency application. Further studies will be needed to determine how these findings translate into future scholarly activity and post-graduate career choice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)284-287
Number of pages4
JournalReports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

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Radiation Oncology
Internship and Residency
Publications
Research
Career Choice
Censuses
Hispanic Americans
PubMed
Internet
Demography
Population

Keywords

  • Pre-residency peer-reviewed publications
  • Race
  • Radiation oncology residents
  • Research productivity
  • Underrepresented minorities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

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title = "Analysis of pre-residency research productivity, dual degree status, and gender distribution of underrepresented minorities among a current United States radiation oncology junior resident class",
abstract = "Background: Among the most competitive medical subspecialties, representation of underrepresented minorities (African–American race and/or Hispanic ethnicity) among resident trainees has historically been low compared to their United States Census general population representation. Research productivity and dual degree status may impact residency applicant competitiveness. To date, such an analysis has yet to be performed in Radiation Oncology. Methods: A list of radiation oncology residents from the graduating class of 2022 was obtained through internet searches. Demographics included were gender and dual degree status. Research productivity was calculated using the number of pre-residency peer-reviewed publications (PRP). Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 179 residents evaluated from the 2022 class, eleven (6.1{\%}) were underrepresented minorities. Compared to the remainder of the class, underrepresented minorities had a lower proportion of men (63.6{\%} versus 69.3{\%}), a higher proportion of dual degrees (45.5{\%} versus 28.6{\%}), and a lower proportion of MD-PhD degrees (9.1{\%} versus 17.2{\%}). Underrepresented minorities had a higher proportion of residents with at least two PRP (72.7{\%} versus 57.1{\%}) and a lower proportion of residents with no PRP (18.2{\%} versus 24.4{\%}). None of these differences reached statistical significance (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Underrepresented minorities were comparable to the remainder of their Radiation Oncology resident class regarding gender distribution, dual degrees status, and likelihood of having at least two peer-reviewed publications cited in PubMed during the calendar year of residency application. Further studies will be needed to determine how these findings translate into future scholarly activity and post-graduate career choice.",
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T1 - Analysis of pre-residency research productivity, dual degree status, and gender distribution of underrepresented minorities among a current United States radiation oncology junior resident class

AU - McClelland, Shearwood

AU - Woodhouse, Kristina D.

AU - Jaboin, Jerry

AU - Zellars, Richard C.

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Background: Among the most competitive medical subspecialties, representation of underrepresented minorities (African–American race and/or Hispanic ethnicity) among resident trainees has historically been low compared to their United States Census general population representation. Research productivity and dual degree status may impact residency applicant competitiveness. To date, such an analysis has yet to be performed in Radiation Oncology. Methods: A list of radiation oncology residents from the graduating class of 2022 was obtained through internet searches. Demographics included were gender and dual degree status. Research productivity was calculated using the number of pre-residency peer-reviewed publications (PRP). Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 179 residents evaluated from the 2022 class, eleven (6.1%) were underrepresented minorities. Compared to the remainder of the class, underrepresented minorities had a lower proportion of men (63.6% versus 69.3%), a higher proportion of dual degrees (45.5% versus 28.6%), and a lower proportion of MD-PhD degrees (9.1% versus 17.2%). Underrepresented minorities had a higher proportion of residents with at least two PRP (72.7% versus 57.1%) and a lower proportion of residents with no PRP (18.2% versus 24.4%). None of these differences reached statistical significance (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Underrepresented minorities were comparable to the remainder of their Radiation Oncology resident class regarding gender distribution, dual degrees status, and likelihood of having at least two peer-reviewed publications cited in PubMed during the calendar year of residency application. Further studies will be needed to determine how these findings translate into future scholarly activity and post-graduate career choice.

AB - Background: Among the most competitive medical subspecialties, representation of underrepresented minorities (African–American race and/or Hispanic ethnicity) among resident trainees has historically been low compared to their United States Census general population representation. Research productivity and dual degree status may impact residency applicant competitiveness. To date, such an analysis has yet to be performed in Radiation Oncology. Methods: A list of radiation oncology residents from the graduating class of 2022 was obtained through internet searches. Demographics included were gender and dual degree status. Research productivity was calculated using the number of pre-residency peer-reviewed publications (PRP). Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 179 residents evaluated from the 2022 class, eleven (6.1%) were underrepresented minorities. Compared to the remainder of the class, underrepresented minorities had a lower proportion of men (63.6% versus 69.3%), a higher proportion of dual degrees (45.5% versus 28.6%), and a lower proportion of MD-PhD degrees (9.1% versus 17.2%). Underrepresented minorities had a higher proportion of residents with at least two PRP (72.7% versus 57.1%) and a lower proportion of residents with no PRP (18.2% versus 24.4%). None of these differences reached statistical significance (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Underrepresented minorities were comparable to the remainder of their Radiation Oncology resident class regarding gender distribution, dual degrees status, and likelihood of having at least two peer-reviewed publications cited in PubMed during the calendar year of residency application. Further studies will be needed to determine how these findings translate into future scholarly activity and post-graduate career choice.

KW - Pre-residency peer-reviewed publications

KW - Race

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KW - Research productivity

KW - Underrepresented minorities

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JO - Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy

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