Air sparging in gate wells in cutoff walls and trenches for control of plumes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

James F. Pankow, Richard Johnson, John A. Cherry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can be stripped from ground water by sparging air into water in wells or in trenches. This well/trench sparging ('WTS') can remove VOCs from plumes of contaminated ground water as that water passes across the sparge zone. With sparging in wells, cutoff walls will be needed to force the contaminated water through the 'gate' wells. With in situ sparging ('ISS'), air is sparged directly into a contaminated aquifer. ISS may be useful in treating local zones of high contamination, but WTS is better suited for treating large plumes of contaminated ground water. Interest in sparging methods is growing because: (1) they do not remove water from the subsurface, and so difficult disposal issues are avoided and an increasingly valuable water resource is not depleted; and (2) the Darcy velocity v in many systems is low, and so only a relatively small volume of water must be treated per unit time. Well/trench sparging (WTS) has the potential to become a useful treatment method for removing VOCs from contaminated ground-water plumes. It is suited for use with most of the solvents and petroleum products which have caused extensive ground-water contamination. The theory of the method is simple, and the theoretical removal efficiencies are predictable as well as adjustable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)654-663
Number of pages10
JournalGround Water
Volume31
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 1993

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air sparging
cutoff wall
Volatile organic compounds
volatile organic compound
trench
Groundwater
plume
well
groundwater
Air
Water
Contamination
water
Petroleum products
Water resources
Aquifers
water resource
petroleum
aquifer
method

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Air sparging in gate wells in cutoff walls and trenches for control of plumes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). / Pankow, James F.; Johnson, Richard; Cherry, John A.

In: Ground Water, Vol. 31, No. 4, 07.1993, p. 654-663.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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