Age-Related Differences in Care Preferences, Treatment Decisions, and Clinical Outcomes of Seriously Ill Hospitalized Adults: Lessons from SUPPORT

Mary Beth Hamel, Joanne Lynn, Joan M. Teno, Kenneth E. Covinsky, Albert W. Wu, Anthony Galanos, Norman A. Desbiens, Russell S. Phillips

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Although older patients preferred less aggressive care than younger patients, many older patients wanted cardiopulmonary resuscitation and care focused on life extension. Patients� families and healthcare providers underestimated older patients’ desire for aggressive care. After adjustment for illness severity, comorbidity, baseline function, and patients’ preferences for aggressive care, older age was associated with lower hospital costs and resource intensity and higher rates of decisions to withhold life-sustaining treatments. In adjusted analyses, older age was associated with a slight survival disadvantage. This survival disadvantage persisted, even after adjustment for aggressiveness of care, suggesting that the relation between age and survival is not accounted for by less aggressive treatment of older patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Elderly
Subtitle of host publicationLegal and Ethical Issues in Healthcare Policy
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages295-301
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781351890878
ISBN (Print)9780754620440
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • Age factors
  • Aged
  • Decision-Making
  • Health Services Research
  • Outcome Assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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  • Cite this

    Hamel, M. B., Lynn, J., Teno, J. M., Covinsky, K. E., Wu, A. W., Galanos, A., Desbiens, N. A., & Phillips, R. S. (2017). Age-Related Differences in Care Preferences, Treatment Decisions, and Clinical Outcomes of Seriously Ill Hospitalized Adults: Lessons from SUPPORT. In The Elderly: Legal and Ethical Issues in Healthcare Policy (pp. 295-301). Taylor and Francis.