Acupuncture-related pneumothorax

David A. Hampton, Robert T. Kaneko, Erika Simeon, Alexis Moren, Susan Rowell, Jennifer Watters

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Acupuncture-related pneumothorax (PTX) is a poorly reported complication of thoracic needling. Recent Chinese literature reviews cited PTXs as the most common adverse outcome. Because of delayed presentation, this complication is thought to be underrecognized by acupuncturists and is largely addressed by hospital and emergency room personnel. The goal of this case study was to demonstrate common risk factors for a PTX, the mechanisms for its development, and protocols to use if one is suspected. Case: A 43-year-old, athletic female with chronic neck pain that was poorly managed with oral medications sought an alternative intervention for pain control. Her treatment plan consisted of weekly acupuncture sessions in the prone and supine positions targeting points along the Bladder, Gall Bladder, and Small Intestine meridians, as well as the right scapular Ah Shi point. She also received infrared lamp therapy. The aim of this approach was to help the patient achieve subjective pain reduction and increased range of motion. Results: One hour after her third treatment session, this patient experienced pleuritic chest pain and dyspnea. She was transported to a local Level-1 trauma center by emergency medical services and was diagnosed with a right-sided PTX. Conclusions: The acupoints addressed, a practitioner's knowledge of variations in anatomy, and a patient's body habitus and medical history are risk factors for PTX development. A patient's initial presentation does not predict future outcome. A benign presentation can evolve into a potentially life-threatening cardiovascular collapse. When PTX is suspected, discussing it with the patient and facilitating appropriate evaluation and intervention by a tertiary-care facility is warranted.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)241-245
    Number of pages5
    JournalMedical Acupuncture
    Volume26
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 1 2014

    Fingerprint

    Acupuncture
    Pneumothorax
    Urinary Bladder
    Pain
    Prone Position
    Meridians
    Acupuncture Points
    Neck Pain
    Trauma Centers
    Supine Position
    Emergency Medical Services
    Tertiary Healthcare
    Articular Range of Motion
    Chest Pain
    Chronic Pain
    Dyspnea
    Small Intestine
    Sports
    Hospital Emergency Service
    Anatomy

    Keywords

    • Acupuncture
    • Body Mass Index
    • Pneumothorax
    • Risk Factors

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Complementary and alternative medicine

    Cite this

    Hampton, D. A., Kaneko, R. T., Simeon, E., Moren, A., Rowell, S., & Watters, J. (2014). Acupuncture-related pneumothorax. Medical Acupuncture, 26(4), 241-245. https://doi.org/10.1089/acu.2013.1022

    Acupuncture-related pneumothorax. / Hampton, David A.; Kaneko, Robert T.; Simeon, Erika; Moren, Alexis; Rowell, Susan; Watters, Jennifer.

    In: Medical Acupuncture, Vol. 26, No. 4, 01.08.2014, p. 241-245.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Hampton, DA, Kaneko, RT, Simeon, E, Moren, A, Rowell, S & Watters, J 2014, 'Acupuncture-related pneumothorax', Medical Acupuncture, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 241-245. https://doi.org/10.1089/acu.2013.1022
    Hampton, David A. ; Kaneko, Robert T. ; Simeon, Erika ; Moren, Alexis ; Rowell, Susan ; Watters, Jennifer. / Acupuncture-related pneumothorax. In: Medical Acupuncture. 2014 ; Vol. 26, No. 4. pp. 241-245.
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