Accuracy of M RI evaluation of pulmonary blood supply in patients with complex pulmonary stenosis or atresia

Andrew J. Powell, Taylor Chung, Michael J. Landzberg, Tal Geva, David Sahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Detailed imaging of pulmonary artery (PA) anatomy and significant aorto-pulmonary collaterals (APCs) is crucial for surgical planning and follow-up in patients with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) and pulmonary stenosis or atresia. Because examination by echocardiography is often technically limited and catheterization is invasive, this study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an alternate non-invasive tool. Thirteen patients (median age 28 years, range: 1-44 years) underwent both cardiac catheterization and MRI within a median of two months (range 0.1-8 months). Diagnoses included tetralogy of Fallot (TOP) with pulmonary atresia (n = 8), TOP with pulmonary stenosis (n = 2), single left ventricle with pulmonary stenosis (n = 2), and complex heterotaxy with pulmonary stenosis (n = 1). The MRI sequences used in this study were ECG-gated spin echo and gradient echo sequences acquired in multiple planes. Compared to catheterization, MRI had 100% sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of main PA (n = 6) and branch PA (n = 13) hypoplasia or stenosis, as well as discontinuous (n = 4) or absent (n = 10) branch PAs. There was complete agreement between catheterization and MRI identification of significant APCs (n = 18). Main PA atresia was noted by MRI in four patients but was not definitively seen by catheterization in any. MRI but not catheterization precisely defined the distance between discontinuous PAs and their relationship to other mediastinal structures. In conclusion, cardiac MRI is a reliable non-invasive imaging modality to define PA and APC anatomy in patients with complex pulmonary stenosis or atresia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-480
Number of pages2
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging
Volume16
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Pulmonary Atresia
Pulmonary Valve Stenosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Lung
Catheterization
Pulmonary Artery
Anatomy
Tetralogy of Fallot
Cardiac Catheterization
Heart Ventricles
Echocardiography
Heart Diseases
Electrocardiography
Pathologic Constriction
Sensitivity and Specificity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Accuracy of M RI evaluation of pulmonary blood supply in patients with complex pulmonary stenosis or atresia. / Powell, Andrew J.; Chung, Taylor; Landzberg, Michael J.; Geva, Tal; Sahn, David.

In: International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging, Vol. 16, No. 6, 1996, p. 479-480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Powell, Andrew J. ; Chung, Taylor ; Landzberg, Michael J. ; Geva, Tal ; Sahn, David. / Accuracy of M RI evaluation of pulmonary blood supply in patients with complex pulmonary stenosis or atresia. In: International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging. 1996 ; Vol. 16, No. 6. pp. 479-480.
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