A structural equation modelling approach examining the pathways between safety climate, behaviour performance and workplace slipping

David I. Swedler, Santosh K. Verma, Yueng-hsiang Huang, David A. Lombardi, Wen Ruey Chang, Melayne Brennan, Theodore K. Courtney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Safety climate has previously been associated with increasing safe workplace behaviours and decreasing occupational injuries. This study seeks to understand the structural relationship between employees' perceptions of safety climate, performing a safety behaviour (ie, wearing slip-resistant shoes) and risk of slipping in the setting of limited-service restaurants. Methods: At baseline, we surveyed 349 employees at 30 restaurants for their perceptions of their safety training and management commitment to safety as well as demographic data. Safety performance was identified as wearing slip-resistant shoes, as measured by direct observation by the study team. We then prospectively collected participants' hours worked and number of slips weekly for the next 12 weeks. Using a confirmatory factor analysis, we modelled safety climate as a higher order factor composed of previously identified training and management commitment factors. Results: The 349 study participants experienced 1075 slips during the 12-week follow-up. Confirmatory factor analysis supported modelling safety climate as a higher order factor composed of safety training and management commitment. In a structural equation model, safety climate indirectly affected prospective risk of slipping through safety performance, but no direct relationship between safety climate and slips was evident. Conclusions: Results suggest that safety climate can reduce workplace slips through performance of a safety behaviour as well as suggesting a potential causal mechanism through which safety climate can reduce workplace injuries. Safety climate can be modelled as a higher order factor composed of safety training and management commitment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-481
Number of pages6
JournalOccupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume72
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Climate
Workplace
Safety
Safety Management
Restaurants
Shoes
Statistical Factor Analysis
Occupational Injuries
Structural Models
Observation
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

A structural equation modelling approach examining the pathways between safety climate, behaviour performance and workplace slipping. / Swedler, David I.; Verma, Santosh K.; Huang, Yueng-hsiang; Lombardi, David A.; Chang, Wen Ruey; Brennan, Melayne; Courtney, Theodore K.

In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 72, No. 7, 01.07.2015, p. 476-481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Swedler, David I. ; Verma, Santosh K. ; Huang, Yueng-hsiang ; Lombardi, David A. ; Chang, Wen Ruey ; Brennan, Melayne ; Courtney, Theodore K. / A structural equation modelling approach examining the pathways between safety climate, behaviour performance and workplace slipping. In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 72, No. 7. pp. 476-481.
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