A simple device for humidification of inspired gases during volatile anesthesia in rats

Melissa E. Martenson, James T. Houts, Mary Heinricher, Bryan E. Ogden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The typical setup for administering volatile anesthetics to laboratory rats does not provide for humidification of the inspired gases, although it is known that failing to provide humidification can lead to airway inflammation and impaired pulmonary function during prolonged experimental protocols. We developed a simple humidification system in which a nebulizer was inserted into the nonrebreathing circuit used with a standard isoflurane vaporizer. We show here that the nebulizer system resulted in anesthetic stability, as measured by withdrawal reflex latency. Although the isoflurane concentration in the delivered gases was reduced, the reduction was a consistent percentage of the vaporizer output throughout the anesthetic range, thereby permitting straightforward adjustment of the vaporizer output.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-48
Number of pages3
JournalContemporary Topics in Laboratory Animal Science
Volume44
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Fingerprint

Nebulizers and Vaporizers
anesthetics
atomizers
anesthesia
Anesthesia
Gases
isoflurane
gases
Equipment and Supplies
rats
Anesthetics
Isoflurane
lung function
reflexes
Social Adjustment
inflammation
Reflex
Pneumonia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

A simple device for humidification of inspired gases during volatile anesthesia in rats. / Martenson, Melissa E.; Houts, James T.; Heinricher, Mary; Ogden, Bryan E.

In: Contemporary Topics in Laboratory Animal Science, Vol. 44, No. 2, 03.2005, p. 46-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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