A randomized controlled trial of patient-reported outcomes with tai chi exercise in Parkinson's disease

Fuzhong Li, Peter Harmer, Yu Liu, Elizabeth Eckstrom, Kathleen Fitzgerald, Ronald Stock, Li Shan Chou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A previous randomized, controlled trial of tai chi showed improvements in objectively measured balance and other motor-related outcomes in patients with Parkinson's disease. This study evaluated whether patient-reported outcomes could be improved through exercise interventions and whether improvements were associated with clinical outcomes and exercise adherence. In a secondary analysis of the tai chi trial, patient-reported and clinical outcomes and exercise adherence measures were compared between tai chi and resistance training and between tai chi and stretching exercise. Patient-reported outcome measures were perceptions of health-related benefits resulting from participation, assessed by the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-8) and Vitality Plus Scale (VPS). Clinical outcome measures included motor symptoms, assessed by a modified Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Examination (UPDRS-ME) and a 50-foot speed walk. Information on continuing exercise after the structured interventions were terminated was obtained at a 3-month postintervention follow-up. Tai chi participants reported significantly better improvement in the PDQ-8 (-5.77 points, P=0.014) than did resistance training participants and in PDQ-8 (-9.56 points, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)539-545
Number of pages7
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Tai Ji
Parkinson Disease
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Resistance Training
Insurance Benefits
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
propylene diquat

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Patient-oriented outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A randomized controlled trial of patient-reported outcomes with tai chi exercise in Parkinson's disease. / Li, Fuzhong; Harmer, Peter; Liu, Yu; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Fitzgerald, Kathleen; Stock, Ronald; Chou, Li Shan.

In: Movement Disorders, Vol. 29, No. 4, 2014, p. 539-545.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, Fuzhong ; Harmer, Peter ; Liu, Yu ; Eckstrom, Elizabeth ; Fitzgerald, Kathleen ; Stock, Ronald ; Chou, Li Shan. / A randomized controlled trial of patient-reported outcomes with tai chi exercise in Parkinson's disease. In: Movement Disorders. 2014 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 539-545.
@article{9e48ca2665104e0293bb5ef87c58aad8,
title = "A randomized controlled trial of patient-reported outcomes with tai chi exercise in Parkinson's disease",
abstract = "A previous randomized, controlled trial of tai chi showed improvements in objectively measured balance and other motor-related outcomes in patients with Parkinson's disease. This study evaluated whether patient-reported outcomes could be improved through exercise interventions and whether improvements were associated with clinical outcomes and exercise adherence. In a secondary analysis of the tai chi trial, patient-reported and clinical outcomes and exercise adherence measures were compared between tai chi and resistance training and between tai chi and stretching exercise. Patient-reported outcome measures were perceptions of health-related benefits resulting from participation, assessed by the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-8) and Vitality Plus Scale (VPS). Clinical outcome measures included motor symptoms, assessed by a modified Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Examination (UPDRS-ME) and a 50-foot speed walk. Information on continuing exercise after the structured interventions were terminated was obtained at a 3-month postintervention follow-up. Tai chi participants reported significantly better improvement in the PDQ-8 (-5.77 points, P=0.014) than did resistance training participants and in PDQ-8 (-9.56 points, P",
keywords = "Exercise, Parkinson's disease, Patient-oriented outcomes",
author = "Fuzhong Li and Peter Harmer and Yu Liu and Elizabeth Eckstrom and Kathleen Fitzgerald and Ronald Stock and Chou, {Li Shan}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1002/mds.25787",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "539--545",
journal = "Movement Disorders",
issn = "0885-3185",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A randomized controlled trial of patient-reported outcomes with tai chi exercise in Parkinson's disease

AU - Li, Fuzhong

AU - Harmer, Peter

AU - Liu, Yu

AU - Eckstrom, Elizabeth

AU - Fitzgerald, Kathleen

AU - Stock, Ronald

AU - Chou, Li Shan

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - A previous randomized, controlled trial of tai chi showed improvements in objectively measured balance and other motor-related outcomes in patients with Parkinson's disease. This study evaluated whether patient-reported outcomes could be improved through exercise interventions and whether improvements were associated with clinical outcomes and exercise adherence. In a secondary analysis of the tai chi trial, patient-reported and clinical outcomes and exercise adherence measures were compared between tai chi and resistance training and between tai chi and stretching exercise. Patient-reported outcome measures were perceptions of health-related benefits resulting from participation, assessed by the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-8) and Vitality Plus Scale (VPS). Clinical outcome measures included motor symptoms, assessed by a modified Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Examination (UPDRS-ME) and a 50-foot speed walk. Information on continuing exercise after the structured interventions were terminated was obtained at a 3-month postintervention follow-up. Tai chi participants reported significantly better improvement in the PDQ-8 (-5.77 points, P=0.014) than did resistance training participants and in PDQ-8 (-9.56 points, P

AB - A previous randomized, controlled trial of tai chi showed improvements in objectively measured balance and other motor-related outcomes in patients with Parkinson's disease. This study evaluated whether patient-reported outcomes could be improved through exercise interventions and whether improvements were associated with clinical outcomes and exercise adherence. In a secondary analysis of the tai chi trial, patient-reported and clinical outcomes and exercise adherence measures were compared between tai chi and resistance training and between tai chi and stretching exercise. Patient-reported outcome measures were perceptions of health-related benefits resulting from participation, assessed by the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-8) and Vitality Plus Scale (VPS). Clinical outcome measures included motor symptoms, assessed by a modified Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Examination (UPDRS-ME) and a 50-foot speed walk. Information on continuing exercise after the structured interventions were terminated was obtained at a 3-month postintervention follow-up. Tai chi participants reported significantly better improvement in the PDQ-8 (-5.77 points, P=0.014) than did resistance training participants and in PDQ-8 (-9.56 points, P

KW - Exercise

KW - Parkinson's disease

KW - Patient-oriented outcomes

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84898059084&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84898059084&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/mds.25787

DO - 10.1002/mds.25787

M3 - Article

C2 - 24375468

AN - SCOPUS:84898059084

VL - 29

SP - 539

EP - 545

JO - Movement Disorders

JF - Movement Disorders

SN - 0885-3185

IS - 4

ER -