A patient education intervention does not improve satisfaction with emergency care

Benjamin Sun, Michael Brinkley, Jennifer Morrissey, Phillip Rice, Thomas Stair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study objective We determine whether a patient education intervention based on a previously validated model increases satisfaction with emergency department (ED) care. Methods A single-page patient education form was distributed on alternating 2-week time blocks for 8 weeks at the triage desk of a single academic ED. Alert, discharged patients were administered an exit interview assessing satisfaction on a 5-point ordinal scale. Secondary outcomes included patient satisfaction measured on a bivariate scale, willingness to return, and process of care indicators previously demonstrated to be associated with satisfaction. Exclusion criteria included air or ground transport to the ED, inability to speak English or Spanish, and refusal to participate. Differences in patient satisfaction and other outcomes were adjusted for predefined covariates, including age, sex, triage severity, race, language, location in ED, total ED length of stay, and time to room, using multivariable logistic regression. Results Of 1,934 patients discharged during study periods, 1,233 (64%) were approached and 860 (44%) were enrolled. There were no important covariate differences between the control and intervention groups. There was no important correlation between intervention and patient satisfaction on univariate (odds ratio [OR] 0.840; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.650 to 1.086) and multivariate analysis (OR 0.874; 95% CI 0.672 to 1.136). There were no important correlations between the intervention and secondary outcomes on multivariate analysis. Conclusion A triage-based, patient education intervention did not significantly improve patient satisfaction or performance on predictors of satisfaction at the study site.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)378-383
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Emergency Medicine
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Emergency Medical Services
Patient Education
Hospital Emergency Service
Patient Satisfaction
Triage
Refusal to Participate
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Length of Stay
Language
Logistic Models
Air
Interviews
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

A patient education intervention does not improve satisfaction with emergency care. / Sun, Benjamin; Brinkley, Michael; Morrissey, Jennifer; Rice, Phillip; Stair, Thomas.

In: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 44, No. 4, 10.2004, p. 378-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sun, Benjamin ; Brinkley, Michael ; Morrissey, Jennifer ; Rice, Phillip ; Stair, Thomas. / A patient education intervention does not improve satisfaction with emergency care. In: Annals of Emergency Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 44, No. 4. pp. 378-383.
@article{6a5a19b297ee495eb170bbfa58a8c009,
title = "A patient education intervention does not improve satisfaction with emergency care",
abstract = "Study objective We determine whether a patient education intervention based on a previously validated model increases satisfaction with emergency department (ED) care. Methods A single-page patient education form was distributed on alternating 2-week time blocks for 8 weeks at the triage desk of a single academic ED. Alert, discharged patients were administered an exit interview assessing satisfaction on a 5-point ordinal scale. Secondary outcomes included patient satisfaction measured on a bivariate scale, willingness to return, and process of care indicators previously demonstrated to be associated with satisfaction. Exclusion criteria included air or ground transport to the ED, inability to speak English or Spanish, and refusal to participate. Differences in patient satisfaction and other outcomes were adjusted for predefined covariates, including age, sex, triage severity, race, language, location in ED, total ED length of stay, and time to room, using multivariable logistic regression. Results Of 1,934 patients discharged during study periods, 1,233 (64{\%}) were approached and 860 (44{\%}) were enrolled. There were no important covariate differences between the control and intervention groups. There was no important correlation between intervention and patient satisfaction on univariate (odds ratio [OR] 0.840; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 0.650 to 1.086) and multivariate analysis (OR 0.874; 95{\%} CI 0.672 to 1.136). There were no important correlations between the intervention and secondary outcomes on multivariate analysis. Conclusion A triage-based, patient education intervention did not significantly improve patient satisfaction or performance on predictors of satisfaction at the study site.",
author = "Benjamin Sun and Michael Brinkley and Jennifer Morrissey and Phillip Rice and Thomas Stair",
year = "2004",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.annemergmed.2004.02.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "378--383",
journal = "Annals of Emergency Medicine",
issn = "0196-0644",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A patient education intervention does not improve satisfaction with emergency care

AU - Sun, Benjamin

AU - Brinkley, Michael

AU - Morrissey, Jennifer

AU - Rice, Phillip

AU - Stair, Thomas

PY - 2004/10

Y1 - 2004/10

N2 - Study objective We determine whether a patient education intervention based on a previously validated model increases satisfaction with emergency department (ED) care. Methods A single-page patient education form was distributed on alternating 2-week time blocks for 8 weeks at the triage desk of a single academic ED. Alert, discharged patients were administered an exit interview assessing satisfaction on a 5-point ordinal scale. Secondary outcomes included patient satisfaction measured on a bivariate scale, willingness to return, and process of care indicators previously demonstrated to be associated with satisfaction. Exclusion criteria included air or ground transport to the ED, inability to speak English or Spanish, and refusal to participate. Differences in patient satisfaction and other outcomes were adjusted for predefined covariates, including age, sex, triage severity, race, language, location in ED, total ED length of stay, and time to room, using multivariable logistic regression. Results Of 1,934 patients discharged during study periods, 1,233 (64%) were approached and 860 (44%) were enrolled. There were no important covariate differences between the control and intervention groups. There was no important correlation between intervention and patient satisfaction on univariate (odds ratio [OR] 0.840; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.650 to 1.086) and multivariate analysis (OR 0.874; 95% CI 0.672 to 1.136). There were no important correlations between the intervention and secondary outcomes on multivariate analysis. Conclusion A triage-based, patient education intervention did not significantly improve patient satisfaction or performance on predictors of satisfaction at the study site.

AB - Study objective We determine whether a patient education intervention based on a previously validated model increases satisfaction with emergency department (ED) care. Methods A single-page patient education form was distributed on alternating 2-week time blocks for 8 weeks at the triage desk of a single academic ED. Alert, discharged patients were administered an exit interview assessing satisfaction on a 5-point ordinal scale. Secondary outcomes included patient satisfaction measured on a bivariate scale, willingness to return, and process of care indicators previously demonstrated to be associated with satisfaction. Exclusion criteria included air or ground transport to the ED, inability to speak English or Spanish, and refusal to participate. Differences in patient satisfaction and other outcomes were adjusted for predefined covariates, including age, sex, triage severity, race, language, location in ED, total ED length of stay, and time to room, using multivariable logistic regression. Results Of 1,934 patients discharged during study periods, 1,233 (64%) were approached and 860 (44%) were enrolled. There were no important covariate differences between the control and intervention groups. There was no important correlation between intervention and patient satisfaction on univariate (odds ratio [OR] 0.840; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.650 to 1.086) and multivariate analysis (OR 0.874; 95% CI 0.672 to 1.136). There were no important correlations between the intervention and secondary outcomes on multivariate analysis. Conclusion A triage-based, patient education intervention did not significantly improve patient satisfaction or performance on predictors of satisfaction at the study site.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4544294826&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=4544294826&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2004.02.002

DO - 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2004.02.002

M3 - Article

C2 - 15459619

AN - SCOPUS:4544294826

VL - 44

SP - 378

EP - 383

JO - Annals of Emergency Medicine

JF - Annals of Emergency Medicine

SN - 0196-0644

IS - 4

ER -