A new technique for noninvasive evaluation of femoral arterial and venous anatomy before and after percutaneous cardiac catheterization in children and infants

David Sahn, Stanley J. Goldberg, Hugh D. Allen, Lilliam M. Valdes-Cruz, Jesus M. Canale, Lothar Lange, Mark J. Friedman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A new ultrasonic method was applied to image the femoral artery and vein in children for evaluation of short- and long-term effects of cardiac Catheterization with femoral percutaneous cannulation. Sixty-six children and infants (aged 5 days to 20 years) were studied with a 9 megahertz electronically focused real time scanner. Adequate studies were obtained in 46 patients before Catheterization, in 26 of 30 short-term follow-up studies and in 14 long-term follow-up studies. Femoral arterial size could be quantitatively measured at the inguinal ligament and a correlation existed between imaged femoral arterial diameter and body weight (r = + 0.82) or body surface area (r = + 0.80). Short-term follow-up ultrasonic imaging studies allowed diagnosis of spasm and other complications of percutaneous femoral arterial puncture. Long-term follow-up studies were performed 4 months to 3 years after Catheterization in 14 patients who had no complications recorded at the time of Catheterization. These revealed significant differences between vessels on the catheterized and uncatheterized (control) sides in only 3 of the 14. High resolution ultrasonic imaging can provide anatomic and functional information about femoral arteries and veins and appears to be of assistance in planning cardiac Catheterization and in studying the short- and long-term effects of percutaneous femoral cannulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-355
Number of pages7
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Cardiac Catheterization
Thigh
Catheterization
Anatomy
Femoral Vein
Femoral Artery
Ultrasonography
Groin
Body Surface Area
Spasm
Punctures
Ligaments
Ultrasonics
Body Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

A new technique for noninvasive evaluation of femoral arterial and venous anatomy before and after percutaneous cardiac catheterization in children and infants. / Sahn, David; Goldberg, Stanley J.; Allen, Hugh D.; Valdes-Cruz, Lilliam M.; Canale, Jesus M.; Lange, Lothar; Friedman, Mark J.

In: The American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 49, No. 2, 01.02.1982, p. 349-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sahn, David ; Goldberg, Stanley J. ; Allen, Hugh D. ; Valdes-Cruz, Lilliam M. ; Canale, Jesus M. ; Lange, Lothar ; Friedman, Mark J. / A new technique for noninvasive evaluation of femoral arterial and venous anatomy before and after percutaneous cardiac catheterization in children and infants. In: The American Journal of Cardiology. 1982 ; Vol. 49, No. 2. pp. 349-355.
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