A neonatal nonhuman primate model of gestational Zika virus infection with evidence of microencephaly, seizures and cardiomyopathy

Rosemary J. Steinbach, Nicole N. Haese, Jessica L. Smith, Lois M.A. Colgin, Rhonda P. MacAllister, Justin M. Greene, Christopher J. Parkins, J. Beth Kempton, Edward Porsov, Xiaojie Wang, Lauren M. Renner, Trevor J. McGill, Brandy L. Dozier, Craig N. Kreklywich, Takeshi F. Andoh, Marjorie R. Grafe, Heidi L. Pecoraro, Travis Hodge, Robert M. Friedman, Lisa A. HouserTerry K. Morgan, Peter Stenzel, Jonathan R. Lindner, Robert L. Schelonka, Jonah B. Sacha, Victoria H.J. Roberts, Martha Neuringer, John V. Brigande, Christopher D. Kroenke, Antonio E. Frias, Anne D. Lewis, Meredith A. Kelleher, Alec J. Hirsch, Daniel Neal Streblow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Zika virus infection during pregnancy is associated with miscarriage and with a broad spectrum of fetal and neonatal developmental abnormalities collectively known as congenital Zika syndrome (CZS). Symptomology of CZS includes malformations of the brain and skull, neurodevelopmental delay, seizures, joint contractures, hearing loss and visual impairment. Previous studies of Zika virus in pregnant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) have described injury to the developing fetus and pregnancy loss, but neonatal outcomes following fetal Zika virus exposure have yet to be characterized in nonhuman primates. Herein we describe the presentation of rhesus macaque neonates with a spectrum of clinical outcomes, including one infant with CZS-like symptoms including cardiomyopathy, motor delay and seizure activity following maternal infection with Zika virus during the first trimester of pregnancy. Further characterization of this neonatal nonhuman primate model of gestational Zika virus infection will provide opportunities to evaluate the efficacy of pre- and postnatal therapeutics for gestational Zika virus infection and CZS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e0227676
JournalPloS one
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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