A National Survey on Teaching and Assessing Technical Proficiency in Vascular Surgery in Canada

Laura Drudi, Sajjid Hossain, Kent S. Mackenzie, Marc Michel Corriveau, Cherrie Abraham, Daniel I. Obrand, Melina Vassiliou, Heather Gill, Oren K. Steinmetz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This survey aims to explore trainees' perspectives on how Canadian vascular surgery training programs are using simulation in teaching and assessing technical skills through a cross-sectional national survey.

METHODS: A 10-min online questionnaire was sent to Program Directors of Canada's Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons' of Canada approved training programs in vascular surgery. This survey was distributed among residents and fellows who were studying in the 2013-2014 academic year.

RESULTS: Twenty-eight (58%) of the 48 Canadian vascular surgery trainees completed the survey. A total of 68% of the respondents were part of the 0 + 5 integrated vascular surgery training program. The use of simulation in the assessment of technical skills at the beginning of training was reported by only 3 (11%) respondents, whereas 43% reported that simulation was used in their programs in the assessment of technical skills at some time during their training. Training programs most often provided simulation as a method of teaching and learning endovascular abdominal aortic or thoracic aneurysm repair (64%). Furthermore, 96% of trainees reported the most common resource to learn and enhance technical skills was dialog with vascular surgery staff.

CONCLUSIONS: Surveyed vascular surgery trainees in Canada report that simulation is rarely used as a tool to assess baseline technical skills at the beginning of training. Less than half of surveyed trainees in vascular surgery programs in Canada report that simulation is being used for skills acquisition. Currently, in Canadian training programs, simulation is most commonly used to teach endovascular skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-226
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Vascular Surgery
Volume33
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Canada
Blood Vessels
Teaching
Education
Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm
antineoplaston A10
Surveys and Questionnaires
Cross-Sectional Studies
Learning
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Drudi, L., Hossain, S., Mackenzie, K. S., Corriveau, M. M., Abraham, C., Obrand, D. I., ... Steinmetz, O. K. (2016). A National Survey on Teaching and Assessing Technical Proficiency in Vascular Surgery in Canada. Annals of Vascular Surgery, 33, 220-226. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avsg.2015.11.028

A National Survey on Teaching and Assessing Technical Proficiency in Vascular Surgery in Canada. / Drudi, Laura; Hossain, Sajjid; Mackenzie, Kent S.; Corriveau, Marc Michel; Abraham, Cherrie; Obrand, Daniel I.; Vassiliou, Melina; Gill, Heather; Steinmetz, Oren K.

In: Annals of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 33, 01.05.2016, p. 220-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Drudi, L, Hossain, S, Mackenzie, KS, Corriveau, MM, Abraham, C, Obrand, DI, Vassiliou, M, Gill, H & Steinmetz, OK 2016, 'A National Survey on Teaching and Assessing Technical Proficiency in Vascular Surgery in Canada', Annals of Vascular Surgery, vol. 33, pp. 220-226. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avsg.2015.11.028
Drudi, Laura ; Hossain, Sajjid ; Mackenzie, Kent S. ; Corriveau, Marc Michel ; Abraham, Cherrie ; Obrand, Daniel I. ; Vassiliou, Melina ; Gill, Heather ; Steinmetz, Oren K. / A National Survey on Teaching and Assessing Technical Proficiency in Vascular Surgery in Canada. In: Annals of Vascular Surgery. 2016 ; Vol. 33. pp. 220-226.
@article{725674a18b3a4fb4ba409042d06fe2d5,
title = "A National Survey on Teaching and Assessing Technical Proficiency in Vascular Surgery in Canada",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: This survey aims to explore trainees' perspectives on how Canadian vascular surgery training programs are using simulation in teaching and assessing technical skills through a cross-sectional national survey.METHODS: A 10-min online questionnaire was sent to Program Directors of Canada's Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons' of Canada approved training programs in vascular surgery. This survey was distributed among residents and fellows who were studying in the 2013-2014 academic year.RESULTS: Twenty-eight (58{\%}) of the 48 Canadian vascular surgery trainees completed the survey. A total of 68{\%} of the respondents were part of the 0 + 5 integrated vascular surgery training program. The use of simulation in the assessment of technical skills at the beginning of training was reported by only 3 (11{\%}) respondents, whereas 43{\%} reported that simulation was used in their programs in the assessment of technical skills at some time during their training. Training programs most often provided simulation as a method of teaching and learning endovascular abdominal aortic or thoracic aneurysm repair (64{\%}). Furthermore, 96{\%} of trainees reported the most common resource to learn and enhance technical skills was dialog with vascular surgery staff.CONCLUSIONS: Surveyed vascular surgery trainees in Canada report that simulation is rarely used as a tool to assess baseline technical skills at the beginning of training. Less than half of surveyed trainees in vascular surgery programs in Canada report that simulation is being used for skills acquisition. Currently, in Canadian training programs, simulation is most commonly used to teach endovascular skills.",
author = "Laura Drudi and Sajjid Hossain and Mackenzie, {Kent S.} and Corriveau, {Marc Michel} and Cherrie Abraham and Obrand, {Daniel I.} and Melina Vassiliou and Heather Gill and Steinmetz, {Oren K.}",
year = "2016",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.avsg.2015.11.028",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "220--226",
journal = "Annals of Vascular Surgery",
issn = "0890-5096",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A National Survey on Teaching and Assessing Technical Proficiency in Vascular Surgery in Canada

AU - Drudi, Laura

AU - Hossain, Sajjid

AU - Mackenzie, Kent S.

AU - Corriveau, Marc Michel

AU - Abraham, Cherrie

AU - Obrand, Daniel I.

AU - Vassiliou, Melina

AU - Gill, Heather

AU - Steinmetz, Oren K.

PY - 2016/5/1

Y1 - 2016/5/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: This survey aims to explore trainees' perspectives on how Canadian vascular surgery training programs are using simulation in teaching and assessing technical skills through a cross-sectional national survey.METHODS: A 10-min online questionnaire was sent to Program Directors of Canada's Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons' of Canada approved training programs in vascular surgery. This survey was distributed among residents and fellows who were studying in the 2013-2014 academic year.RESULTS: Twenty-eight (58%) of the 48 Canadian vascular surgery trainees completed the survey. A total of 68% of the respondents were part of the 0 + 5 integrated vascular surgery training program. The use of simulation in the assessment of technical skills at the beginning of training was reported by only 3 (11%) respondents, whereas 43% reported that simulation was used in their programs in the assessment of technical skills at some time during their training. Training programs most often provided simulation as a method of teaching and learning endovascular abdominal aortic or thoracic aneurysm repair (64%). Furthermore, 96% of trainees reported the most common resource to learn and enhance technical skills was dialog with vascular surgery staff.CONCLUSIONS: Surveyed vascular surgery trainees in Canada report that simulation is rarely used as a tool to assess baseline technical skills at the beginning of training. Less than half of surveyed trainees in vascular surgery programs in Canada report that simulation is being used for skills acquisition. Currently, in Canadian training programs, simulation is most commonly used to teach endovascular skills.

AB - BACKGROUND: This survey aims to explore trainees' perspectives on how Canadian vascular surgery training programs are using simulation in teaching and assessing technical skills through a cross-sectional national survey.METHODS: A 10-min online questionnaire was sent to Program Directors of Canada's Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons' of Canada approved training programs in vascular surgery. This survey was distributed among residents and fellows who were studying in the 2013-2014 academic year.RESULTS: Twenty-eight (58%) of the 48 Canadian vascular surgery trainees completed the survey. A total of 68% of the respondents were part of the 0 + 5 integrated vascular surgery training program. The use of simulation in the assessment of technical skills at the beginning of training was reported by only 3 (11%) respondents, whereas 43% reported that simulation was used in their programs in the assessment of technical skills at some time during their training. Training programs most often provided simulation as a method of teaching and learning endovascular abdominal aortic or thoracic aneurysm repair (64%). Furthermore, 96% of trainees reported the most common resource to learn and enhance technical skills was dialog with vascular surgery staff.CONCLUSIONS: Surveyed vascular surgery trainees in Canada report that simulation is rarely used as a tool to assess baseline technical skills at the beginning of training. Less than half of surveyed trainees in vascular surgery programs in Canada report that simulation is being used for skills acquisition. Currently, in Canadian training programs, simulation is most commonly used to teach endovascular skills.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85011579371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85011579371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.avsg.2015.11.028

DO - 10.1016/j.avsg.2015.11.028

M3 - Article

C2 - 26965813

AN - SCOPUS:84962191089

VL - 33

SP - 220

EP - 226

JO - Annals of Vascular Surgery

JF - Annals of Vascular Surgery

SN - 0890-5096

ER -