A multicenter randomized controlled trial of two group education programs for fatigue in multiple sclerosis: Long-term (12-month) follow-up at one site

Cinda L. Hugos, Michelle Cameron, Zunqiu Chen, Yiyi Chen, Dennis Bourdette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: A four-site RCT of Fatigue: Take Control (FTC), a multicomponent group program, found no significant differences from a control program, MS: Take Control (MSTC), in fatigue on the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) through 6 months. Objective: Assess FTC for a delayed effect on fatigue. Methods: Of 78 subjects at one site, 74 randomized to FTC or MSTC completed the MFIS at 12 months. Results: Compared to baseline, FTC produced greater improvements in MFIS scores than MSTC (FTC −8.9 (confidence interval (CI): 32.2, 45), MSTC −2.5 (CI 39.6, 47.7), p = 0.03) at 12 months. Conclusion: The delayed effect of FTC on fatigue suggests the need for longer follow-up when assessing interventions for fatigue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMultiple Sclerosis Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Multiple Sclerosis
Fatigue
Randomized Controlled Trials
Education
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • clinical trial
  • fatigue
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • rehabilitation
  • self-care
  • symptom management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "A multicenter randomized controlled trial of two group education programs for fatigue in multiple sclerosis: Long-term (12-month) follow-up at one site",
abstract = "Background: A four-site RCT of Fatigue: Take Control (FTC), a multicomponent group program, found no significant differences from a control program, MS: Take Control (MSTC), in fatigue on the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) through 6 months. Objective: Assess FTC for a delayed effect on fatigue. Methods: Of 78 subjects at one site, 74 randomized to FTC or MSTC completed the MFIS at 12 months. Results: Compared to baseline, FTC produced greater improvements in MFIS scores than MSTC (FTC −8.9 (confidence interval (CI): 32.2, 45), MSTC −2.5 (CI 39.6, 47.7), p = 0.03) at 12 months. Conclusion: The delayed effect of FTC on fatigue suggests the need for longer follow-up when assessing interventions for fatigue.",
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AU - Cameron, Michelle

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AU - Bourdette, Dennis

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N2 - Background: A four-site RCT of Fatigue: Take Control (FTC), a multicomponent group program, found no significant differences from a control program, MS: Take Control (MSTC), in fatigue on the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) through 6 months. Objective: Assess FTC for a delayed effect on fatigue. Methods: Of 78 subjects at one site, 74 randomized to FTC or MSTC completed the MFIS at 12 months. Results: Compared to baseline, FTC produced greater improvements in MFIS scores than MSTC (FTC −8.9 (confidence interval (CI): 32.2, 45), MSTC −2.5 (CI 39.6, 47.7), p = 0.03) at 12 months. Conclusion: The delayed effect of FTC on fatigue suggests the need for longer follow-up when assessing interventions for fatigue.

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