A Mixed-Method Investigation of Parent Perspectives on Early Childhood Behavioral Services in Primary Care

Andrew R. Riley, Bethany L. Walker, Krishnapriya Ramanujam, Wendy M. Gaultney, Deborah J. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Primary care is a key setting for the delivery of parent-focused behavioral interventions. Various methods of intervention show promising efficacy but fail to engage adequate parental participation. This study used a sequential-explanatory mixed-method design to understand factors underlying parents’ attitudes toward the content, sources, and delivery methods of behavioral guidance in primary care. Fifteen parents who previously participated in a larger survey study participated in interviews about their experiences and attitudes toward integrated primary care. Qualitative data were analyzed and sorted by quantitative data of interest to identify demographic, child, and parental factors that shape attitudes toward integrated care. Parents emphasized a need for tailored behavioral guidance, and multiple interconnected factors (e.g., trust of providers, perceived convenience of delivery modalities, stigma associated with behavioral health services) drove parents’ attitudes toward behavioral primary care. These attitudes varied based on socioeconomic status, child behavior symptoms, and reported use of corporal punishment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Behavioral Health Services and Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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