"You don't go tell white people nothing": African American women's perspectives on the influence of violence and race on depression and depression care

Christina Nicolaidis, Vanessa Tlmmons, Mary Jo Thomas, A. Star Waters, Stephanie Wahab, Angle Mejia, S. Renee Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We sought to understand how African American women's beliefs regarding depression and depression care are influenced by racism, violence, and social context. Methods. We conducted a focus group study using a community-based participatory research approach. Participants were low-income African American women with major depressive disorder and histories of violence victimization. Results. Thirty women participated in 4 focus groups. Although women described a vicious cycle of violence, depression, and substance abuse that affected their health, discussions about health care revolved around their perception of racism, with a deep mistrust of the health care system as a "White" system. The image of the "strong Black woman" was seen as a barrier to both recognizing depression and seeking care. Women wanted a community-based depression program staffed by African Americans that addressed violence and drug use. Conclusions. Although violence and drug use were central to our participants' understanding of depression, racism was the predominant issue influencing their views on depression care. Providers should develop a greater appreciation of the effects of racism on depression care. Depression care programs should address issues of violence, substance use, and racism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1470-1476
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume100
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2010

Fingerprint

Violence
African Americans
Racism
Depression
Focus Groups
Community-Based Participatory Research
Delivery of Health Care
Crime Victims
Major Depressive Disorder
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Substance-Related Disorders
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

"You don't go tell white people nothing" : African American women's perspectives on the influence of violence and race on depression and depression care. / Nicolaidis, Christina; Tlmmons, Vanessa; Thomas, Mary Jo; Star Waters, A.; Wahab, Stephanie; Mejia, Angle; Renee Mitchell, S.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 100, No. 8, 01.08.2010, p. 1470-1476.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nicolaidis, Christina ; Tlmmons, Vanessa ; Thomas, Mary Jo ; Star Waters, A. ; Wahab, Stephanie ; Mejia, Angle ; Renee Mitchell, S. / "You don't go tell white people nothing" : African American women's perspectives on the influence of violence and race on depression and depression care. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2010 ; Vol. 100, No. 8. pp. 1470-1476.
@article{fcaace7663de422c8be04473f8a8e5b8,
title = "{"}You don't go tell white people nothing{"}: African American women's perspectives on the influence of violence and race on depression and depression care",
abstract = "Objectives. We sought to understand how African American women's beliefs regarding depression and depression care are influenced by racism, violence, and social context. Methods. We conducted a focus group study using a community-based participatory research approach. Participants were low-income African American women with major depressive disorder and histories of violence victimization. Results. Thirty women participated in 4 focus groups. Although women described a vicious cycle of violence, depression, and substance abuse that affected their health, discussions about health care revolved around their perception of racism, with a deep mistrust of the health care system as a {"}White{"} system. The image of the {"}strong Black woman{"} was seen as a barrier to both recognizing depression and seeking care. Women wanted a community-based depression program staffed by African Americans that addressed violence and drug use. Conclusions. Although violence and drug use were central to our participants' understanding of depression, racism was the predominant issue influencing their views on depression care. Providers should develop a greater appreciation of the effects of racism on depression care. Depression care programs should address issues of violence, substance use, and racism.",
author = "Christina Nicolaidis and Vanessa Tlmmons and Thomas, {Mary Jo} and {Star Waters}, A. and Stephanie Wahab and Angle Mejia and {Renee Mitchell}, S.",
year = "2010",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2105/AJPH.2009.161950",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "100",
pages = "1470--1476",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
publisher = "American Public Health Association Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - "You don't go tell white people nothing"

T2 - African American women's perspectives on the influence of violence and race on depression and depression care

AU - Nicolaidis, Christina

AU - Tlmmons, Vanessa

AU - Thomas, Mary Jo

AU - Star Waters, A.

AU - Wahab, Stephanie

AU - Mejia, Angle

AU - Renee Mitchell, S.

PY - 2010/8/1

Y1 - 2010/8/1

N2 - Objectives. We sought to understand how African American women's beliefs regarding depression and depression care are influenced by racism, violence, and social context. Methods. We conducted a focus group study using a community-based participatory research approach. Participants were low-income African American women with major depressive disorder and histories of violence victimization. Results. Thirty women participated in 4 focus groups. Although women described a vicious cycle of violence, depression, and substance abuse that affected their health, discussions about health care revolved around their perception of racism, with a deep mistrust of the health care system as a "White" system. The image of the "strong Black woman" was seen as a barrier to both recognizing depression and seeking care. Women wanted a community-based depression program staffed by African Americans that addressed violence and drug use. Conclusions. Although violence and drug use were central to our participants' understanding of depression, racism was the predominant issue influencing their views on depression care. Providers should develop a greater appreciation of the effects of racism on depression care. Depression care programs should address issues of violence, substance use, and racism.

AB - Objectives. We sought to understand how African American women's beliefs regarding depression and depression care are influenced by racism, violence, and social context. Methods. We conducted a focus group study using a community-based participatory research approach. Participants were low-income African American women with major depressive disorder and histories of violence victimization. Results. Thirty women participated in 4 focus groups. Although women described a vicious cycle of violence, depression, and substance abuse that affected their health, discussions about health care revolved around their perception of racism, with a deep mistrust of the health care system as a "White" system. The image of the "strong Black woman" was seen as a barrier to both recognizing depression and seeking care. Women wanted a community-based depression program staffed by African Americans that addressed violence and drug use. Conclusions. Although violence and drug use were central to our participants' understanding of depression, racism was the predominant issue influencing their views on depression care. Providers should develop a greater appreciation of the effects of racism on depression care. Depression care programs should address issues of violence, substance use, and racism.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77954474447&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77954474447&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2105/AJPH.2009.161950

DO - 10.2105/AJPH.2009.161950

M3 - Article

C2 - 20558811

AN - SCOPUS:77954474447

VL - 100

SP - 1470

EP - 1476

JO - American Journal of Public Health

JF - American Journal of Public Health

SN - 0090-0036

IS - 8

ER -